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Matches 201 to 250 of 1193

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   Notes   Linked to 
201 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
202 It is thought that the Boyd and Marshall families migrated from Alabama to Texas together. Boyd Richard W
 
203 Birth: 1820
Alabama, USA
Death: 1855

Samuel L Boyd was born ca 1820 in Alabama. Parents are unknown.

He and his wife Mary Green were living in Benton County (currently Calhoun County), Alabama, in 1850. They had five children: Augustus, twins Eugenia and Oscar, Samuel, and Julia Boyd.

On 3 February 1853, Samuel purchased 555 acres of land from William and Rebecca Love and on 17 July 1854, he purchased 911 acres from WW Hackworth in Washington County, Texas, just west of the present town of Burton in the Samuel Hinch League.

Although no death date has been found, it is believed that he had died by 12 January 1856, the probable date of the inventory in the probate records. His estate was valued at $20,079, of which $10,000 was land. He was probably buried in the family cemetery.

His widow married William H Carmack and she continued to live on the original Boyd property with her new husband.

Family links:
Spouse:
Mary Green Boyd Carmack (1820 - 1897)*

Children:
Augustus Boyd (1842 - 1867)*
Eugenia Boyd (1844 - ____)*
Oscar Boyd (1844 - ____)*
Samuel Boyd (1847 - 1869)*
Julia Boyd (1848 - 1867)*

*Calculated relationship


Burial:
Boyd-Carmack Cemetery
Burton
Washington County
Texas, USA

Maintained by: Washington County Geneal...
Originally Created by: meet Virginia
Record added: Feb 18, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 48302618
 
Boyd Samuel L.
 
204 1817 Hez. Spires requests the distribution of the estate of Isaac Willingham in right of his wife to:
Caleb Willingham
William Willingham
Reuben Willingham
John Willingham
Isaac Willingham
Mary Willingham
John and Isaac represented by their guardian William Willingham and Mary represented by her guardian Hez. Spires 
Brasfield Martha
 
205 Notes for Joel BRAWNER:
Joel Brawner's Will
Filed in office Sept. 18th, 1866 J.A. Howard, Ordinary
Original will is handwritten by Joel Brawner
State of Georgia:
Bartow County:
In the [name] of God Amen, I Joel Brawner of said State and County being of advanced age and knowing that I must shortly depart this life deem it rite and proper bothmy self and family that I should make a disposition of the property of which a kind Providence has blessed me with do therefore make this my last will and testament hereby revoking all others heretofore made by me. I give and bequeath to Betsy Ann Sanders heirs one hundred dollars. I also appoint Jesse J. Brawner Guardian for said heirs.
John F. Brawner and his heirs and eaqueal portion of the ballance of said state.
also Jane Tolbert and her heirs and eaqueal portion of the ballance of said state.
also Sarah E. Tabler an her heirs and eaqueal portion of the balance of said state.
Sarah C. Bakers heirs and eaqueal portion of the ballance and I also appoint Jesse J. Brawner
Guardian for said heirs.
William K. Brawners heirs and eaqueal portion of the ballance of said estate.
Jesse J. Brawner and his heirs and eaqueal portion of the ballance of said estate.
Susan F. Odoms heirs and eaqueal portion of the ballance. I also appoint Jesse J. Brawner
Guardian for said heirs.
David G. Brawner and his heirs and eaqueal portion of the ballance the of said estate.
Henry M. Brawner and his heirs and eaqueal portion of the ballance of said estate.
Joel Brawner (Seal)
Signed, Sealed, delivered and published by Joel Brawner as his last Will and Testament in the presents of us the subscribers who subscribed our names hereto in the presents of said testator at his special request and each of us this 25th August 1866.
W.H. King
Test: H.M. Brawner
John F. Brawner
Source: Will of Joel Brawner, Bartow County, GA Records.
This indenture made this seventeenth day of December, eighteen hundred and twenty-two between JOEL BRAWNER of the one part and JAMES OLIVER of the other part and both of the County of Elbert, and state of Georgia witnesseth that of said JOEL BRAWNER hath for and in consideration of the sum of four hundred dollars to him in hand paid the receipt whereof I hereby acknowledged both bargained and sold release and confirmed and bt this presence doth bargain and sell release and confirm unto the said JAMES OLIVER all that parcel of land lying and being in the state and county aforesaid and on the branch of DOVES BROOK (Creek?) containing two hundred acres by the
______ more or less beginning on a black and gum corner on GATESWOOD line running from thence a straight line to a stake and corner on ROBERT KINGS line thence down said branch to a poplar and corner on said KINGS line thence down the line to a black gum corner and thence a straight line to AMBROUSE KINGS line and Spanish oak thence on said line to a post oak on THOMPSONS line thence a straight line to the beginning black gum corner thence together with all and singular rights, the rights and titles appertaining to have and to hold the aforesaid premises unto the said JAMES OLIVER his heirs and assign forever in ______ and the aforesaid JOEL BRAWNER doth hereby waiver and forever defend the aforesaid promises from himself and his heirs and assigns and from every other person or persons whatsoever so that the said JAMES OLIVER his heirs and assigns shall have ______ pocession of the land as witness my hand and seal this day and date mentioned above written.
Signed in the presence of JOEL BRAWNER
Bucley (?) Andrew
John L. Christain Recorded
this 12th Oct. 1830
Reuben Christain J.P.
Land Record:
(From Some Georgia County Records, Volume 3, Page 185)
Sheriff's Deed from James Flecther, sheriff Henry Co. on writ from Justice Court of Elbert Co., in suit of F. and R. Jordan agst. Joel Brawner, siezed land on 6th Jan 1824 sold same to Fleming Jordan for sum of $50. Deed dated 6 Jan 1824 fot tract in Henry Co., Lot No. 218 in 12th Dist. Signed: James Fletcher, Sheriff. Wit: Thos. C. Benning, David Johnson, J.P. Rec.15, Jan. 1824.
Regarding Jesse Johnson Brawner and his wife Mary Ann Quarles had 16 children.Roughly half of these children moved to Texas.
Family folklore has it that Joel Brawner (1798-1866), a native of Elbert Co., GA, was shot in the back by a Union soldier in Cartersville GA when he refused to water the horses of the Union soldiers. Joel, the story goes, died of his wound three days later, but his wife, Betsy King
(1800-1866), died immediately after the shooting of a heart attack.
Historical Marker at the Bartow County Courthouse
Bartow County
Originally Cass, Bartow County was created by Act of Dec. 3,1832 from Cherokee County. The name was changed Dec. 6, 1861 to honor Gen. Francis S. Bartow (1816-1861), Confederate political leader and soldier, who fell mortally wounded at the First Battle of Manassas, while leading the 7th and 8th Ga. Vols. of his brigade. His last words were said to be, "They have killed me, boys,
but never give up." First officers of this County, commissioned March 9, 1833, were: Benjamin F. Adair, Sheriff; Chester Hawks, Clerk Superior Court; Leathern Rankin, Clerk Inferior Court; Nealy Goodwin, Surveyor; John Pack, Coroner.
(Location: At the Courthouse in Cartersville.) 
Brawner Joel
 
206 Parents were Abraham Brinkley and Judith lnu Brinkley Sarah P
 
207 Additional Information on the
Wagon Train to Texas - 1854

For Texas

The Richmond, Virginia Enquirer of the 29th ultimo, says:
A sight, novel and interesting, was witnessed by many of our citizens on Wednesday last. A train of wagons, numbering 28 in all, accompanied by about 75 persons, male and female, old and young, passed through our city, on their way to Texas. The train was one-fourth of a mile in length, and with the large company, numerous guns, dogs, and other paraphernalia, for a long journey, formed a sight of no little interest. Upon inquiry we learned that the party consisted of 10 or more families, from the neighborhood of Sparta, Carolina County, who had united for the purpose of forming a settlement in Texas, and trying their fortunes in a fertile region of that new portion of our confederacy. The company we learn, embraced the families of Andrew S. Broaddus (with thirteen interesting children), John W. Sale, Widow Thomas Sale, N. B. Farmer, Claiborne Houston, Lunsford Houston, Mrs. Harriet Sale, John Longwell, Samuel J. Murray, Mrs. Smoot, and perhaps others. They intend making the entire journey by land, and have ample preparations for a comfortable and economical trip. They have started with a liberal amount of the "creature comforts," have fine camp equipage, for their accommodation at night and meal hours; and a social material which ensures the long journey to be one of pleasure more than fatigue. While it is a matter of regret to see so many of our good citizens leaving the Old Dominion, the homes of their fathers and the scenes of many endearing associations, we part with them with our earnest wishes for their health, happiness and prosperity in the distant place selected for their future homes. They go, we learn, to homes already selected. Like wise men, in the first place, they commissioned Mr. Broaddus, a gentleman of intelligence, to visit Texas and select an advantageous location for a "Caroline settlement." Now, they go there at an auspicious season to commence farming and to prepare for the next crops.

Source: The Texas Ranger and Lone Star, Vol. 6 ? Num. 1, Ed. 1
Washington, Texas, Saturday, October 28, 1854 
Broaddus Andrew Sidney
 
208 Birth: Jan. 28, 1828
Upson County
Georgia, USA
Death: Dec. 9, 1913
Bellville
Austin County
Texas, USA

History of Wyatt M. Brooks

Bellville, Tex, Dec 10, '13 (1910)

On Tuesday afternoon just as the sun was setting and already lost behind the dark threatening clouds, and the great Brazos flood was hanging over its valley from hill to hill and dealing death and destruction, one who had already given up the fight and calling for rest chose that day, full of sorrow, gloom and pathos, as the closing chapter of a long life and career, fully in keeping with the scenes around him, Wyatt M. Brooks, at the age of eight-five years and ten months, without pain or sickness, just simply became weary of his burdens and quit the fight and went to sleep and one more of the few remaining old citizens and Texas pioneers has vanished, leaving the work he began to a younger generation.

For 43 years he lived at the Brooks home on the hill overlooking the town and noted every change during all these years. The only near relatives he leaves is one sister in Waller county, one brother in Hays county and one son, J. W. Brooks, of this place, who is a surveyor and prominently know here.

Wyatt Marion Brooks was born in Upshur county, Georgia, January 24, 1828, of American parentage. On his father's side the Scotch blood prevailed, while on his mother's side, the Irish blood prevailed. He was the second son and third child of a family of eight children all reaching adult age in life and all save one reaching the age of 50 years or more.

When about 14 years of age his father removed from Georgia to Alabama. Here the subject of this sketch grew to Manhood, familiar with all the joys and hardships incident to poor people in a new country. Upon reaching his majority, he started in life overseeing for two bachelor brothers, whose father's home was on Sundays and other rest days, and it was to this aged man of conservative thought, wealth and influence, that he ever, in after life, pointed to as the guiding star of his earthly aims and hopes, it was to this man's precepts that made him an unfaltering Unionist during the exciting days just before our civil war. But when his adopted State (Texas) seceded, he volunteered and joined the ranks to defend his country in a cause which he believed to be wrong.

In January, 1852, W. M. Brooks removed to Texas and settled at Semponius; two years later he removed to Bellville, where he remained in and around until his death. After coming to Texas, he followed the carpenter's trade, together with cotton gin and press pin press (???) until the breaking out of the civil war.

In 1855, he married Louise Jane Atkinson, a native of Austin county, who died August 20th, 1894. Early in 1861 he joined the Confederate army, 26th Texas Cavalry, known as DeBray's Regiment, Company H, Frank Dupree, Captain, in which command he remained until the close of the war in 1865.

The first two years of the war were spent in and around Galveston, doing coast duties. The remaining two years were spent in facing the enemy in real warfare. After the war, he returned home to his family, wrecked in physical health and of his meager accumulations of worldly possessions, and started in life anew as best he could. In boyhood he was familiar with Indian outbreaks and murders, notably that of the burning and almost total destruction of the inhabitants of Ronevak, Ga., a small town near where his father lived. Has killed bear within two and a half miles of the court house at Bellville and deer, turkeys and smaller game almost within the town limits. Quite a number of times he has pointed out the buildings still standing that were here when he came to Bellville, all of which have been removed except one now owned, and occupied by S. A. Hill.

Family links:
Parents:
Williamson Brooks (1800 - 1879)
Susannah Olliff Brooks (1800 - 1851)

Spouse:
Louisa Jane Atkinson Brooks (1836 - 1894)*

Children:
John Williamson Brooks (1856 - 1939)*

Siblings:
Mary Jordan Brooks Whittington (1823 - 1903)*
John Clark Brooks (1825 - 1891)*
Wyatt Marion Brooks (1828 - 1913)
Allen Turner Brooks (1830 - 1912)*
Robert Wright Brooks (1833 - 1907)*
Sarah E. Brooks Shelburne (1836 - 1914)*
Francis Asberry Brooks (1837 - 1897)**
Elisa Brooks Ferguson (1846 - 1871)**

*Calculated relationship
**Half-sibling

Burial:
Atkinson Cemetery
Bellville
Austin County
Texas, USA

Created by: DSmith
Record added: Sep 29, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 30176608 
Brooks Wyatt Marion
 
209 Footnote 302:

Westmoreland Deed and Wills, 1747 - 1753; pp 121 - 123; George Leazure Brown, and wife, Betty, of St Stephens Parish, Northumberland Co, on 24 Mar 1750, leased to ROBERT and JOHN MIDDLETON, son "to said Eleanor Booth deced., 100 acres in Cople, Westmoreland, formerly belonging to William Shoars. [ Shears? the last husband of Elizabeth Berry Knott Bennett Mann Tingley Shears ], from Shoars to Wm Short and from him to George Leazure, 23 Feb 1703, and from Leazure to his daughter, Eleanor, mother of said George L Brown, land bounded by BENJAMIN MIDDLETON, Samuel Harrison, John Harrison and ROBERT MIDDLETON. witnesses: WM MIDDLETON, JEREMIAH MIDDLETON, William Allgood (Ancestor of Reuben Algood) and BENEDICK MIDDLETON, signed by George Leazure Brown and Betty Brown and recorded 17 Apr 1751.

 
Brown George Leazure
 
210 Father of Leasure Brown Middleton

1708 Northumberland County, Virginia
o Abrev. Will of George Leazure/Leasure
Dated 17 Nov 1708, prob 20 April 1709, to dau Hannah land pur of Edw. Minty in Westmoreland Co. To dau Elinor land pur of Will Short in Westmorland Co. To dau Eliza. the 3 daus all under 10 years of age. the child my wife goes with. Wife Hannah, she and his brother Barthol Leasure exors. Wit: G. Eskridge, Sam'll Demourville, George Harryson, Re-rec by Geo Eskridge 22 March 1710/11. 17.59
o (Note: Elinor Leasure would have been born 1698-1708)
(Note: 1st husband of Elinor Leasure, father of Leasure Brown Middleton)
1738 June 10 Will;Northumberland Co. VA Wills and Administrations; 1713-1749; Compiled and Published by James F. Lewis and J. Motley Booker, M. D., p.14a(113) Thomas Brown of St. Stephens Parish left tract of land to son Thomas Brown; If Thomas should die, land to go to other son Footman Brown; rest of estate to be equally divided between my wife and children. Wife: Ellinor Brown and William Taylor, executors. Wife to be possessed with my land until my children come of age. Witness:John Lewis, Parish Garner
Bef. 24 Mar 1750 Westmoreland County, Virginia
o Married Well and Often: Marriages of the Northern Neck of Virginia 1649-1800.
Booth, (fnu) and Brown, Eleanor (wid); bef 24 March 1750; bride was a dau of George Leazure and wid of (fnu) Brown: (WC DW S:121)
(This is where the March 24, 1750 date originated from:
Westmoreland Deed and Wills, 1747 - 1753; pp 121 - 123; George Leazure Brown, and wife, Betty, of St Stephens Parish, Northumberland Co, on 24 Mar 1750, leased to ROBERT and JOHN MIDDLETON, son "to said Eleanor Booth deced., 100 acres in Cople, Westmoreland, formerly belonging to William Shoars. [ Shears? the last husband of Elizabeth Berry Knott Bennett Mann Tingley Shears ], from Shoars to Wm Short and from him to George Leazure, 23 Feb 1703, and from Leazure to his daughter, Eleanor, mother of said George L Brown, land bounded by BENJAMIN MIDDLETON, Samuel Harrison, John Harrison and ROBERT MIDDLETON. witnesses: WM MIDDLETON, JEREMIAH MIDDLETON, William Allgood (Ancestor of Reuben Algood) and BENEDICK MIDDLETON, signed by George Leazure Brown and Betty Brown and recorded 17 Apr 1751.)


William and Mary College Quarterly, 1st Series, Vol. 17, ed. Lyon G. Tyler, Kraus Reprint Co., Richmond, VA; 1977
Northumberland County, Virginia
page 239
James Booth, son to James and Eleanor, was born March 6, 1740
Richard Booth, son to James and Eleanor, was born March 20, 1742
Eleanor, Daughter to James and Eleanor, was born Dec. 9, 1745.


WILLS AND ADMINISTRATIONS, NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 1750-1770.,
Compiled and Published by J. Motley Booker, M. D., Page 9, Record Book
#1 (1750-1751) page 200
Booth, James, W. W. 31 December 1750---W. P. 14 January 1750 (W. W. date must have been 31, Dec. 1749)
Brother Richard Booth and friend George Leazure Brown, executors.
To Hannah West-five pounds current money. Rest of estate to children
James Booth, Richard Booth, and Eleanor Booth.
Witness: Thomas Williams, Sam'l Eskridge and Robert Clake.
In front of book W.W. is abrev. for Will written W. P.-Will Probated

Northumberland Co. Virginia
10 September 1750
Brown Orphan Account
Pursuent to an order of Northumberland Court Dated 10th of September 1750 Directed to us the Subscribers we accordingly met at the house of Mr. JAMES BOOTH and have possed THOMAS BROWN with his part of his Fathers Estate it Being Ten Pounds Sixteen Shillings & Eleven pence Current Money of Which we have possessed him with as Faloeth Viz,
1 Bed and Furniture L3..10..0
1 Large Bevall? Table 1..10..0
1 Cow and Calf 1?7..6
1 Cow big with Calf 1?5..0
1 small Shear (?) 0..18..0
1 large Red Do. 1..10..0
Cask ?.16..5
10..16..11
SAMUEL ESKRIDGE
ROBERT CLARKE
WILLIAM ESKKRIDGE
At a Court held for Northumberland County the 8th Day of October 1750. This Report of the Division of THOMAS BROWNS Estate Returned and ordered to be Recorded Teste:

Thomas Brown's receipt of his father's estate. (Note: Thomas Brown, brother of Leasure Brown Middleton) (We know from Bible records that Leasure was born 1727)




Mentioned is Thomas Brown. Also the John Footman Jr. one daughter I believe is Elizabeth Footman that married Harrison and had daughter Hannah Harrison that married Benedict Middleton.
John & Susannah West of Northumberland Co Va

Posted by: Gary E Young (ID *****1277)
Date: October 12, 2010 at 06:18:14
of 11426



These people have been frequently confused with other Wests in nearby counties. Does anyone have a serious interest in this couple? John West was a miller who died before 20 May 1696 in Northumberland Co. He had been married twice, first wife unknown. His widow, Susannah married before 23 Sep 1698 to Manly Brown (d. 1711). Susannah had children by both husbands. By John West she had: John West, born 2 Feb. 1695. Were there other children by West? By her second marriage Susannah had: Manly Brown Jr (b 1699), Thomas Brown (b. 1701, d. 1738), Hester Brown (b. 1707), Susannah Brown (b. 1710). I have only minimal information on the spouses of Susannah's children.
Susannah was almost certainly a Footman, a dau of John Footman Sr who died intestate in Westmoreland Co in 1694. John Footman Jr, who died in 1739 in Westmoreland leaving only one daughter, named some residuary legatees including one son of Susannah and John West, and one grandson of Susannah and Manly Brown (her grandson Footman Brown).


Northumberland County, VA; St. Stephens Parish birth records
DAVID Brown's family
Manley son of David Brown born 3 September 3 1677.
Thomas Brown son of David born 18 Dec 1683
David son of David born 29 July 1687

MANLEY Brown's family (Note: Father of Thomas Brown married Elinor Leasure)
Richard Brown son of Manley b. 16 March 1689
Mary Daughter of Manley Brown b. 16 March 1692
Charles Brown son of Manley born 6 December 1695
Manley Brown son of Manley born 8 December 1699
Thomas Brown son of Manley born 23 November 1701 [My note: He is of the right age to be Elinor's husband. Her father's will was probated in 1709, and it was stated in the will that his 3 daughters were under 10 years of age at that time ]
Hester.Brown daughter of Manley born 18 Oct 1707
Susanna, daughter of Manley Brown born Oct 13, 1710
It appears that DAVID and MANLEY, the fathers, may be brothers, older than anyone listed here. If that is the case, then the will below would be that of Manley Brown the elder, father of Thomas.

1747 August Last will of Mandley Brown; St. Stephens Parish, Northumberland Co. VA; (Attached)
"To my Godson William Telour my Negro man Sam; if he should die without heirs then said Negro to go to John Telour, his brother and my will is that the said Negroe Sam shall remain and be with my Loveing Sister Elizabeth Telour for and during her natural life and if the said Negroe should live five years than............and it is my will that my said sister Elizabeth Telour shall for .........of five years pay to my Executor four hundred pounds of Tob.(?) each year for the use of her son Mandly Telour until it amounts to Two Thousand pounds of Tobacco and ....he is kept four years at School our of said Tobacco. Item, I give my gun to John Telour my said sisters second? son . Item .......my Executor may buy for Ann Jones my said Sisters Daughter one pair of stays of twenty shillings value. All the rest of my Estate I leave to be Equally divided b....... my said sister Elizabeth Telour.........................William Telour to.....[etc. some parts are very hard to read.]
This will is unsigned and has no witnesses. Recorded directly following the will is:
At a Court held for Northumberland County the 8th Day of July 1751 (?)
This last will and testament of Manly Brown dec'd was presented in Court by Wm. Taite Gent. the Extr therein named to be proved according to law upon which George Leazure Brown entered a Caveat against the same and the proof of the said will was continued till the next Court when several Witnesses were Examined on both sides in relation to the same; Thereupon from Testimoney of the said Witnesses it is the opinion of the Court that the said Will is good and ought to be recorded upon Which Certificate is granted the said Executors who made oath according law for obtaining a Probate thereof in due form.
A court record for Northumberland County, VA 12 September 1751: Inventory and appraisment of the estate of Mandley Browen Dec'd was returned and ordered to be recorded. (attached)
Thomas Brown, the son of Manly Brown, was the husband of Elinor Leasure and the father of George Leazure Brown and I believe the father of Leazure Brown Middleton. Manly Brown, d. 1747 would be their grandfather.

It appears that the land of Manley Brown who sold the 50 acres to our Thomas Middleton belonged to his father, Manley Brown.



The Manley Brown that died in 1747 in Northumberland Co., VA left property to his sister Elizabeth (Brown) Telour/Taylor.

A court record for Northumberland County, VA 12 September 1751: Inventory and appraisment of the estate of Mandley Browen Dec'd was returned and ordered to be recorded

Elinor Leasure Brown Booth timeline kp
Mentioned in father, George Leasure?s will 1708, under 10 years old.
Leasure Brown Middleton born 1727
Thomas Brown will June 10, 1738, mentions wife Ellinor Brown
Elinor Brown marries James Booth prior to March 6, 1740 when it the birth of first child is recorded. Third child, Eleonor?s birth was recorded in December 1745.
Will proved for James Booth Jan. 1750- Does not mention a wife
Note: George Leasure Brown and family also moved to Guilford County, North Carolina.





 
Brown Leazure
 
211 From bible of William and Elizabeth Landman Middleton Bible provided by Cindi McChristian Brown Leazure
 
212 1738 June 10 Will;Northumberland Co. VA Wills and Administrations; 1713-1749; Compiled and Published by James F. Lewis and J. Motley Booker, M. D., p.14a(113)

Thomas Brown of St. Stephens Parish left tract of land to son Thomas Brown; If Thomas should die, land to go to other son Footman Brown; rest of estate to be equally divided between my wife and children. Wife: Ellinor Brown and William Taylor, executors. Wife to be possessed with my land until my children come of age. Witness:John Lewis, Parish Garner

 
Brown Thomas
 
213 Manley son of David Brown born 3 September 3 1677.
Thomas Brown son of David born 18 Dec 1683
David son of David born 29 July 1687

[My Note MANLEY Brown's family??????????]
Richard Brown son of Manley b. 16 March 1689
Mary Daughter of Manley Brown b. 16 March 1692
Charles Brown son of Manley born 6 December 1695
Manley Brown son of Manley born 8 December 1699
Thomas Brown son of Manley born 23 November 1701
Hester.Brown daughter of Manley born 18 Oct 1707
Susanna, daughter of Manley Brown born Oct 13, 1710


1747 August Last will of Mandley Brown; St. Stephens Parish, Northumberland Co. VA; (Attached)
"To my Godson William Telour my Negro man Sam; if he should die without heirs then said Negro to go to John Telour, his brother and my will is that the said Negroe Sam shall remain and be with my Loveing Sister Elizabeth Telour for and during her natural life and if the said Negroe should live five years than............and it is my will that my said sister Elizabeth Telour shall for .........of five years pay to my Executor four hundred pounds of Tob.(?) each year for the use of her son Mandly Telour until it amounts to Two Thousand pounds of Tobacco and ....he is kept four years at School our of said Tobacco. Item, I give my gun to John Telour my said sisters second? son . Item .......my Executor may buy for Ann Jones my said Sisters Daughter one pair of stays of twenty shillings value. All the rest of my Estate I leave to be Equally divided b....... my said sister Elizabeth Telour.........................William Telour to.....[etc. some parts are very hard to read.]

This will is unsigned and has no witnesses. Recorded directly following the will is:

At a Court held for Northumberland County the 8th Day of July 1751 (?)
This last will and testament of Manly Brown dec'd was presented in Court by Wm. Taite Gent. the Extr therein named to be proved according to law upon which George Leazure Brown entered a Caveat against the same and the proof of the said will was continued till the next Court when several Witnesses were Examined on both sides in relation to the same; Thereupon from Testimoney of the said Witnesses it is the opinion of the Court that the said Will is good and ought to be recorded upon Which Certificate is granted the said Executors who made oath according law for obtaining a Probate thereof in due form.

A court record for Northumberland County, VA 12 September 1751: Inventory and appraisment of the estate of Mandley Browen Dec'd was returned and ordered to be recorded

MANLY BROWN, 5 Mar 1749; 3 Dec 1750, Richmond (Wills of...1699-1800, F232,R4,H4, 1983 (S 1/95).
wife; sons JAMES & RICHARD; ex: b-i-l Lewis LAMKIN and wife; servant boy John Heland to be sold & not appraised; wits: Geo. LAMKIN, John BROWN, Mary LAMKIN. (Manly & Mary BROWN had the following children:
James b 1741
Richard b 1745
Hannah b 1751 
Brown Thomas
 
214 Edwin Simpson was the stepbrother of Emeline Howth Keesee. A newspaper article at the Chappell HIll Museum
mentions that he died in Hempstead March 1865 due to abolitionist sentiments. 
Buck Edwin Simpson
 
215 Harriett Bumpas was first married to a McIntyre and then after the loss of her husband, she married William Chappell.) Bumpas Harriet
 
216
___________________________________________________________

The Palestine Herald, Palestine, Texas
May 21, 2013
Residents urged to welcome back local troops on Wednesday

By CHERIL VERNON
Palestine Herald-Press

PALESTINE ? Palestine area residents are asked to help welcome back the local National Guard troops, which will be coming by bus to the National Guard Armory in Palestine at about 3 p.m. Wednesday.

?We are hoping that the community will come out around the loop (Loop 256) to welcome the guys back,? Veterans Historic Education Center Director Evelyn Cupit said. ?We suggest people coming out around the loop from 2:30 to 2:45 p.m. It would be nice to have people shoulder to shoulder around the loop.?

The bus is expected to come into Palestine from U.S. 79 from Jacksonville, taking a left on Loop 256, and will be traveling in front of Palestine High School and the Palestine Mall area until arriving on the northside of Loop 256 to the National Guard Armory, located at 601 Armory Rd.

The VHEC is working with the local Family Readiness Group, led by Phyllis King, to organize the ?welcome back? event for Palestine?s National Guard Delta Unit 144, which was deployed to Afghanistan in May 2012.

Close to 30 members of the unit were deployed ? some from the Palestine area and others from Tyler, Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth areas.

A brief ceremony will be held at the armory before they will be released to their families. The men arrived safely back on American soil on May 11.

Families of the troops have been told they can be at the armory around 2 p.m. in anticipation of the troop?s return.

?We will have a big homecoming party for the guys in September when they have their first active drills,? Cupit said. ?On Wednesday, we just want them to know that we welcome them back and thank them for their service. They will be released to their families on leave as soon as the short ceremony is over.?
 
Burleson Bradley
 
217 KELLER (CBSDFW.COM) With the school year almost over, middle school teacher Brad Burleson won?t be rewarded with a 3 month summer break. When classes end, he'll become Sgt. Burleson, leading a group of soldiers on his third military deployment.

My unit's being deployed to Afghanistan, says Burleson. A member of the Army National Guard, Burleson has already been to Iraq twice. When asked why he's willing to risk so much, his response, in so many words: why not?

It's hard to put into words, says Burleson. I look at it as, I've got guys all around me doing the same. Why them and not me? At its core, he says, is a desire to serve; whether it's in the classroom or for his country.



It's about integrity, duty and honor, says Fossil Hill Middle School Principal Todd Lacey. All of those things Mr. Burleson has, and he models those for the kids.

So his Fossil Hill farewell was filled with fun and fanfare. A morning basketball game pitched teachers against the students. And in the afternoon, a pep rally to honor a teacher whose toughest assignment will come when classes end.

This is real life, this is not television, this is not about a movie, says Lacey. This is real and we know he's going into harms way. Our prayers are going to be for him. He's going to be okay, though, because he's got a family that's pulling for him.

And while his Fossil Hill family will be praying for his safety, he admits that it will be hard to leave his wife of 8 years and their 14 month old son, Strykr.

It's hard enough leaving your wife, says Burleson. I just love him to death and it's going to be difficult to leave him behind and miss out on a year of his life.

Still, Burleson will walk the talk he has so often given to his students. Always realize that there's always something bigger than yourself.
 
Burleson Bradley
 
218 Prior to the family members organizing a cemetery association several members of the Calhoun family were re-interred in the cemetery, having been moved from the old Calhoun Cemetery in Comal County near the settlement of Sattler. This was done when the Calhoun Cemetery had to be moved when Canyon Dam was being built. It was to be covered with lake water. Most of the descendants of the families buried in Mt. Sharp did not know of this action until after it was done. Along with the bodies of the Calhoun family was the body of an itinerate preacher who had been buried in the Calhoun Cemetery when he had taken ill and died while in the Sattler area. Calhoun James
 
219 CALVERT, ROBERT
Texas State History Association
Online Handbook


CALVERT, ROBERT (1802?1867). Robert Calvert, cotton planter and Texas legislator, was born February 19, 1802, near what would become Wartrace, Tennessee, son of William and Lucy (Rogers) Calvert. Calvert spent his earliest years in Tennessee, but the family moved to northern Alabama when he was still a child. Calvert married Mary Keesee on August 28, 1823, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and ran a farm there until 1838. During that year he moved to Saline County, Arkansas, where he served several terms as county judge and was active in local politics.

Calvert settled in Robertson County, Texas, in 1850. He cleared a large plantation in the Brazos River valley and grew corn and cotton, making a substantial fortune. Between 1853 and 1860 Judge Calvert served several terms in the Texas legislature for Robertson County. Calvert became an influential man both during his time in the legislature and by aiding the Confederate war effort by provisioning the army. He used his influence to advocate the extension of the Houston and Texas Central Railway through Robertson County. He was successful, and the town that became the railhead of the Houston and Texas Central was named Calvert in his honor upon the railway's completion in 1868.

Robert Calvert was an elder in the Presbyterian Church and donated the land for the original site of Calvert's First Presbyterian Church, although it was moved from Calvert's plantation site to the town of Calvert after the Civil War. Late in life Calvert joined the Masons, rising quickly in the organization and becoming a Knight Templar. Robert and Mary Calvert had at least four children. Robert Calvert died on September 20, 1867, during the yellow fever epidemic of that year and is buried in the Presbyterian cemetery that once adjoined the church two miles west of Calvert in Robertson County.




BIBLIOGRAPHY:

John Henry Brown, Indian Wars and Pioneers of Texas (Austin: Daniell, 1880; reprod., Easley, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1978).



Jennifer Eckel

Other sites:

http://www.calverttx.com/history.html

http://www.texasescapes.com/CentralTexasTownsSouth/Calvert-Texas.htm

 
Calvert Robert
 
220 ________________________________________________________
Archiver > CALVERT > 2004-07 > 1090596909
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From: daipdq@juno.com
Subject: Re: Robert Calvert / Calvert, Texas
Date: 23 Jul 2004 09:35:09 -0600

This is a Message Board Post that is gatewayed to this mailing list.

Surnames: Calvert Rutherford Keesee
Classification: Query

Message Board URL:

http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec/msg/an/WQH.2ACEB/1087.1

Message Board Post:

Calvert is north of Bryan / College Station on Rt. 6, south of Waco. It has an historic main street of Victorian vintage structures. You can just visualize even today, the city as the turn of the century approached, with dirt streets and horse drawn vehicles or later a mixture of the two.

There are photos available on line. I have been planning a photo survey myself for the town and Cemeteries. It is about 1 1/2 hours from my home.

I haven't really looked into this family per se. Roberts father was William whom I believe was born in GA or AL? But lived in TN. Robert apparently migrated from TN to AR to TX. You can see via the Census 1860 that Robert was b in AR but Mary was born in Texas. so around 1850 Robert arrived at Sterling which is near Calvert and we know from historical records that the city of Calvert was founded by him. He was a Judge and State Legislator.

The census of 1860 shows:

US CEnsus 1860 Robertson Co Part 3 Sterling Roll M653-1303, p 176 image 8 and 9:

Robert 58 Farmer 43,000 75,500 b TN
Mary 54 Hkp b TN
William 30 Farmer b AL
Robert C Rutherford 16 Clerk b AR
William T 14 b AR
Mary E 12 b AR
Pauline Rutherford 9 b AR
Robert 10 b AR
Mary 8 b TX
Nelson Vosburgh 52 Stockman b NY?
Barnett Thomas 25 Overseer b AL

From the census it would indicate that he was b 1801 to 1803
depending upon the month of birth and date of the actual enumeration. I have seen the date elsewhere as 1806.

Family cemetery, now Sterling Cemetery outside of Calvert:

A fenced-in area is visible from the road. This is the Calvert Family cemetery plot, which is only a small portion of the cemetery. Other markers can be found on several acres in the surrounding fields which are now somebody's pasture.

An historic marker reads: "Burial place of some 400 Texas pioneers and descendants. On land granted (1835) to A. J. Webb; bought in 1850 by Judge Robert Calvert, a civic leader in Sterling, a town named for Empresario Sterling Clack Robertson. Calvert dedicated 11.1-acre cemetery and built adjacent Cumberland Presbyterian Church of his own plantation timber. In 1867, Judge Calvert died and was buried near cemetery gate. The church building was moved by oxen to new town of Calvert (2 mi. E). In 1868, his wife, Mary Keesee Calvert, and their three daughters deeded cemetery site to the Cumberland Presbyterians." (#10950/1973)

CALVERT, JUDGE ROBERT, 2.19.1802 - 9.20.1867, b Wartrace, TN, s William & Lucy Rogers Calvert, w Mary Keesee, came to Little Brazos Valley in 1850, Calvert named after him, died in yellow fever epidemic

CALVERT, MARY KEESEE, 10.11.1807 - 12.16.1873, h Judge Robert Calvert, c William, Lucy (Mrs. George W.) Rutherford, Pauline (Mrs. J. Tom) Garrett, Mary (Dr. Peter) Smith

CALVERT, WILLIAM, 9.6.1826 - 12.13.1864, s Judge Robert & Mary Keesee Calvert, suffering from a malady contracted in the Mexican War, unable to serve CSA, c Robert (killed in action CSA)


Here is an Article on Calvert Texas:

Ancestry Magazine

May/June 1998 vol. 16 no. 3

Calvert, Texas: Preserving a Town's Heritage
? Sunny Nash
Family historians with a desire to preserve historic towns could model themselves after the residents of Calvert, Texas, a town that celebrates its past by developing profitable historic programs that boost its economy.

The Calvert Chamber of Commerce and Robertson County Historical Commission advertise annual events to attract visitors from the region who participate in a variety of activities. Aside from the economic benefits?sales of gifts, souvenirs, and antiques, as well as restaurant, ticketed event, and concession business-historic programs promote a strong sense of fellowship and pride among the community's residents.

King Cotton
Calvert's multifaceted past provides a great deal of raw material for creating these intriguing historic programs. In the midst of the nineteenth-century Old West, Calvert-assaulted by the sounds of gunfire and cotton gins-began as a collection of saloons, outlaw hangouts, farms, plantations, and homesteads scattered among 156,000 acres of some of Texas's most productive cotton fields. Before the Civil War, plantations of the fluffy white commodity, produced by slaves and poor white laborers, supported the economy of the entire area.

Cotton production was still so important to the area after the Civil War that early in the 1870s, the Gibsons of Galveston transported a story-and-a-half European flywheel on a twenty-oxen cart to Calvert. After a trip that took several months, the Gibsons built the world's largest cotton gin in the town. Until fire destroyed the structure in 1965, Calvert residents lived, worked, ate, and slept to the slow, churning rhythm of steam (and, later, diesel) engines turning the flywheel.

The Railroad Arrives
The cotton economy in Calvert was still king when rails began crawling across the Texas plains. (Eager to connect its interior territories, the United States began building railroads through old Native American hunting grounds in the mid-1800s, using the cheap labor of former bondsmen and imported foreign workers.) By 1869, the railroad had arrived in Calvert. The first train blew into town in June carrying passengers, supplies, farm equipment, building materials, and luxuries for new homes. In the hot Texas sun, hundreds of wagons awaited the train, loaded with equal amounts of raw materials to be shipped back to Houston factories. In the months that followed, some 30,000 Civil War refugees found their way to Calvert looking for work?low-paying work in the cotton fields and cotton service industries, or slightly better-paying railroad work.

The two-hundred-mile stretch of track from Houston eventually made Calvert the railhead from the Texas Gulf Coast. When people had first learned of the planned railroad to Calvert, they had eagerly bought land in the vicinity to develop and sell. Once the railroad arrived, adventurous and ambitious settlers and merchants flocked to the flat Texas wilderness behind the Houston and Texas Central Railroad to build homes, start families, and open businesses. These settlers constructed churches, schools, opera houses, ladies' auxiliary groups, men's fraternities, Bible clubs, parks, and theatres. Soon Calvert's exploding economy supported a shift from frame buildings to permanent masonry structures.

Arrival of the railroad in Calvert caused a number of social and economic changes. One development was the seedy characters that followed the railroad tracks to town. Shoot-outs along muddy Main and Railroad streets often interrupted family dinners in nearby homes. In mid-chew, the frightened people of Calvert abandoned their exquisite meals on fine porcelain china, crystal stemware, and silver services to scramble beneath expensive furniture or take cover behind imported lace curtains that had been mail-ordered and special-delivered by rail.

Banks and Saloons
French immigrants Bertrand and Jacques Adoue were the town's first bankers. These financiers built Texas's first power and ice plant in Calvert. Adolph Busch of St. Louis warehoused his beer at the Calvert Ice, Water, and Electric Company. (Unfortunately, in 1975, two weeks after the National Historic Registry recognized the building that held the ice house, the building was destroyed by a tornado.)

Rowdy saloons lined each side of the sixty-four-foot Main Street, which was wide enough to allow wagons and mule teams to turn around and for horses to be hitched on either side. (Muddy Main Street was eventually improved with concrete and a layer of bricks. Iron stop markers lay embedded in the brick intersections until road construction eliminated the artifacts in the late 1980s.) Main Street's most notorious saloon, because of the number of killings there, was Jake's Place. Downstairs Jake sold a mug of beer and a slice of ham on rye for five cents, and regular customers hung their personal mugs by the bar. The gambling rooms were located upstairs.

Bandits and Outlaws
Railroad and stagecoach prosperity-and local watering holes such as Jake's Place-invited such outlaws as Belle Starr, John Wesley Hardin, Sam Bass, and others who terrorized train and stagecoach passengers, robbed banks, and stole horses. Texas Ranger Leland McNelly chased these and other bandits from Burton through Calvert to the wooded area called Robber's Roost, a few miles north of Calvert near Bremond.

One of the most notorious of these outlaws was Belle Starr (born Myra Bell Shirley), who was believed to be a Confederate spy. Myra came with her family to Calvert from Missouri during the Civil War. Soon after the Shirleys had opened a livery business, young Myra took up with Frank and Jesse James. Then she joined the Younger brothers and bore Cole Younger's daughter, Pearl. Afterwards, Myra joined the Reed gang and had Jim Reed's son. When Reed was killed, she rode with thieves to Cherokee Territory, where she married Sam Starr and received his name and Cherokee citizenship. When Sam Starr was killed, Belle married the Creek Jim July. After a violent quarrel with her new husband, the bandit queen was hunted and killed by a hired gun.

Victorian Texas
As unlikely as it may seem, amidst what appeared to be complete chaos, many of Calvert's wealthier residents hired the best architects from around the world to design and build grand houses and public buildings. These residents, striving for refined lives, acquired possessions that would become heirlooms, dating back to a time when Texas was a nation.

Because of its gracious style of living, Calvert acquired the nickname "Victorian Texas." To complement the town's regal lifestyle, Frenchman J. P. Cashimir designed and constructed the Calvert opera house, equipped with a large stage, several dressing rooms, and box seats. The theatre presented productions from Houston and Dallas and hosted Jewish worshippers who were without a synagogue. Some of these Jewish worshippers were merchants who operated stores and ran the Grand Hotel, which was torn down and sold for its lumber and bricks during the Second World War.

In the mid-1870s, when railroad construction continued north to Dallas, Calvert went from railhead to an insignificant whistle stop along the route between Houston and Dallas. The end of railroad prosperity, technological advances in the cotton industry, and the introduction of synthetics halted Calvert's economic growth. Finally, a ghostly quiet covered Calvert when yellow fever hit the town in 1873. Three hundred people died and thousands fled. However, boom times had left their mark permanently on Calvert's architecture and landscape.

Preserving a Heritage
Not much has been collected or written about Calvert, which, with a population of 15,000, was the fourth-largest city in Texas at the end of the last century. Even the Texas State Archives lack a single photograph of Calvert-historic or present. But the dwindling population of Calvert (about 1,500 people today) does not seem alarmed or anxious to parcel out the town's history to the highest bidder and risk losing its identity. In fact, Calvert's senior inhabitants have taken the responsibility of preserving local history and sharing it with one another and with visitors in a number of ways: through monthly meetings of historical groups, annual Christmas tours of historic homes, and pilgrimages to historic homes and buildings during the city's Spring Festival.

Deeply rooted families such as the Anderson, Barton, Cain, Cochran, Conitz, and Wiese families are among the descendants of Calvert's original settlers. "Little towns like ours must preserve and honor themselves," says Pauline Burnett, former chairperson of the Robertson County Historical District. Burnett is a descendant of the town's founder, Robert Calvert, who was a wealthy Robertson County landowner with enough influence within the circle of state, federal, and railroad officials to secure himself part of the contract for the Houston and Central Texas Railroad. Burnett recognized more than twenty years ago that the city's future could be resurrected from its rich architectural past.

For several generations, Calvert families have kept heirlooms, ancestral photographs, period furniture, documents, and artifacts in the same arrangement their great-grandparents kept them more than one hundred years ago. This quietly preserved past is then transferred to the next generation. Even newcomers who purchase historic homes and buildings in Calvert eagerly maintain period standards in restoration and furnishings.

At the same time other towns its size have been leveling century-old shingles, bricks, and mortar to make room for pre-fab modulars, Calvert has been raising funds to restore and preserve original architecture that has not been destroyed by fire or storm. The town recently restored Virginia Field Memorial Park, deeded to the city by German immigrants in 1868. This monument to the memory of the woman who supported the park for many years contains a pavilion designed by a New York architect. At the turn of the twentieth century, the pavilion bounced with dancing to the music of the Calvert Coronet Band; teens carved their initials in the wood to declare eternal love; and, for years, local, state, and national candidates campaigned from that public forum.

A Historic Legacy
No other town in Robertson County?or other town of its size in Texas?can match the number of Calvert's historic structures. Many houses, facilities, and public buildings constructed between 1870 and 1900 were officially declared historic in 1978 and are listed in the National Historic Register. "Calvert has fifty-nine homes still standing that are more than one hundred years old," says LaVerne Smith, secretary of the Calvert Chamber of Commerce. These homes, she adds, are in addition to one-hundred-year-old churches, hotels, coach houses, the cotton weigh station, City Hall, pavilions, the cemetery, and storefront buildings that line Main Street. Calvert's fire bell and antique fire engine and a relic of a water fountain, donated by the civic league in 1912, are examples of the artifacts Calvert maintains.

"We are as important to American history as any of the celebrated locations in the United States," Pauline Burnett says. "And we have the proof."

Sunny Nash, photojournalist and author of the family memoir Bigmama Didn't Shop at Woolworth's, consults with those who are compiling family histories, memoirs, heirloom photographs, and old documents for collection, reproduction, or publication.
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From other sources I find the following...William Calvert and Lucy Rogers were Robert's parents, William born in VA. I cannot attest to their accuracy but this was found online and was placed by Helen R. Flach kwflach@aol.com. See my note on the William Nodding below and the potential relationship of this family line to William Calvert b 1757 according to O'Gorman. I am working with another Calvert researcher on this family and from what I have found I believe that the actual birthdate for William is 1754, that he is the William who came to Maryland from PA to join the Flying Circus Squardon of MD during the Revolutionary War and may be the William who received bounty lands in Mercer County PA afterwards--my speculation only, so take the above inference with a grain of salt except for the apparent locale of Wm. Nodding and association to the William, father of Robert of Sterling and Calvert Tx.

Washington County Tennessee Index to Early Land Owners, 1780 - 1820, compiled by Oveda Meier, SLC, UT, 1989, page 9 lists William Calvert, 1787, with property in Washington County TN.

William Calvert is also listed on tax lists 1792-1799, county court minutes, inventory, will, deeds, Supreme Court Minutes, and county pleas for Washington County, TN, as cited in "Tennesseans Before 1800" by Marjorie Hood fischer.

East Tennessee History, reprinted from Goodspeed's History of Tennessee, reorganized and indexed by Sam McDowell, Utica, KY, page D29: "The first Baptist Church organized in the county was the Cherokee Creek Church, constituted in 1783 by Tidence Lane. Among its first members were James Keels, John Broyles, John Layman, William Murphy, Owen Owens, William Calvert, Reuben, John, and Thomas Bayless, Thomas and Francis Baxter."

Tennesseans in the War of 1812, transcribed and indexed by Byron and Samuel Sistler, Nashville, TN, 1992, page 107 lists two William Calverts: (1) Calvert, William, 1st Lt., Col. Ewen Allison, Capt. Samuel Allen, E TN Mil, Res omitted.; and (2) Calvert, William, Pvt, Maj. William Russell, Capt. Isaac Williams, Separate Bn of TN Vol Mtd Gunmen.

Washington County Tennessee Deeds, 1775 - 1800, by Loraine Rae, page 167, lists the following entry on May 19th, 1796: p. 325-7, 11/7/1795: Daniel McCray & William Calvert, executors of the estate of William Noding, dec. to George Stearmore/Stearmer: (1) 88 acres on Cherokee Creek. ADJ: Widow Sherfy (Sherly?) Chambers. FOR: Joseph Pinson's entry 832, CONS: $86 -2/3. (2) 50 acres on the south side of the north fork of Cherokee. CONS: $50. ADJ: John Bayless, Joseph Pinson, Moffit, John North. FOR: grant #866 of 7/5/1790. SIG: Daniel McCray X, William Calvert. WIT: Jacob Brown, Samuel Wood, John Hunter X. CT: Feb 1796.

p 85 of the same source lists: p. 118-9, 8/20/1789 Jonathan Bird, Hawkins Co. to William Calvert: 127 acres on Pinson's branch of Little Limestone. CONS: 60 lbs NC money. ADJ: Samuel Wood. SIG: Jonathan Bird X, Rachel Bird X. WIT: Samuel Wood, Gabriel Philips, Charles McCray.

Washington County Tennessee Deeds, 1797-1817, Vol. 2, by Loraine Bennett Rae, p 116 lists: p. 226-8, 4/20/1809 Tenn. #455 to William Calvert: Entry in the Sixth District #40 dated 3/19/1808, founded on Warrant #826 issued from Adam's office to Michael Montgomery for 640 acres 12/18/1792, assigned by Montgomery to Thomas King, by King to John A. McKinney and by McKinney to John Kennady, 76 acres of which were assigned by Kennady to William Calvert; the Enterer; 76 acres on Pinsons branch of Little Limestone joining his other land. SIG: John Sevier, by R. Houston, Sec. ADJ: Colvin Finch, Samuel Bayles, Cas. REG: in land office 4/20/1809 by Edward Scott, register of E. Tenn. land office. REG: Wash. Co. 4/24/1810.

Washington County, TN Records transcribed by Mary Hardin McCown, Vol. 1, Washington County Lists of Taxables, 1778-1801, lists Capt. William Calvert as Capt. of his company; his taxable land for 1791 is 127 acres, 1 White person, for 1792, 1795, 1796 and 1797 is 127 acres, 1 White and 1 Black person; for 1799 is 277 acres, one White and 1 Black person; for1801 is 352 acres, one White and 2 Black persons.

Spent boyhood in Rogersville (Hawkins Co. ) TN. Was living in 1802 near Wartrace (Bedford Co.) TN. Moved to Tuscaloosa AL in 1813, and spent the rest of his life there. James used to say 2 of William's brothers went to Texas. There may be more children.

Death Notice for James Calvert, his son, dated Mar 9, 1878, speculated that they came from around Rogersville, TN, then to AL.

From notes from Ellen Calvert:

The father of Robert Calvert b. 1802 was William Calvert and his mother, before marriage, was Lucy Rogers, both reared in Tennessee, and the latter a native of that state. His ancestry on his father's side is traced to Ireland and on his mother's side to England. His parental grandfather emigrated from Ireland to America towards the close of the last century and settled in Winchester, Virginia, whence he moved at a later date to Tennessee. He was a Scotch-Irish Presbyterian and was amply endowed with the rugged virtues and strict religious views for which his people were distinguished.
[side note here: It is readily obvious that this researching is indicating the relationship to William Nodding. I do not have the validity of proof for this family tree. I do know that there is a William Calvert b 1757 according to EFG in Descendents of Virginia Calverts, This William born MD but married wife in VA and migrated to TN. I had known that the Noddings (sic) ended up there. The compiler of the data does not make an association of William Calvert, father of Robert Calvert of Calvert, TX but it is at least geographically significant. In this genealogy, Thomas b 1750 in VIrginia is the Grandfather of Robert

I do know that the Descendents of William Calvert and Elizabeth Nodding end up in Missouri--DEB 7/23/04)

Robert was reared to the practice of these virtues and schooled int he same religious faith, never departing from them in after life. He grew up in Tennessee and North Alabama, his parents moving to the latter state during his boyhood. In Bibb County, Alabama, on the 28th day of August 1823, he married Miss Mary Keesee and, settling on a farm, resided there until 1838.

From letter from Elizabeth Calvert McIntyre: "William Calvert born in 1775, died Aug 23, 1823, was the brother of Jane Calvert from tombstones near Mt. Moriah Church (this church was established May 1, 1852). Also from church records. These records are in the possession of Hosea Allen. William Calvert bought a place near Mt. Moriah Church and later sold it to Allen, grandfatehr of Hosea Allen. This farm is now know as the Allen Place. See records, Centerville, County Seat, Bibb Co. AL.
Change Date: 12 MAR 2002

Father: Thomas Calvert b: ABT 1750 in Virginia

Marriage 1 Lucy Rogers b: ABT 1775 in Tennessee
Married: ABT 1800 in Tennessee
Children
Robert Calvert b: 9 FEB 1802 in Wartrace, TN
Jane "Gensy" Calvert b: 8 MAR 1804 in Tennessee
Mary "Polly" Calvert b: 26 JUN 1806 in Tennessee
James Calvert b: 11 DEC 1808 in Washington Co TN
Nancy Calvert b: 22 JAN 1811 in Tennessee
Lucy Calvert b: ABT 1812
Paulina Calvert b: 28 NOV 1818 in near Mt. Moriah, Hills Stlmt, Bibb Co AL
William Calvert
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Regards,
David Bell
 
Calvert Robert
 
221 1810- John Camp senior, makes a will which is not recorded in the county. It has been maintained over time by relatives of Jennifer O'Kelley large suitcase with many other family documents. I have transcribed the will with all spelling as I have been able to read it. A puzzling problem for me with this will is "who is Mary Camp?" the beloved wife of John. Most have thought that Mary Tarpley Camp died in 1789 but that may not be the case a indicated here. We need more information to prove there was a second marriage and who it may have been.

"In the name of God Amen I John Camp sener of the state of Georgia and Walton County Being in my parfeet reason but being very low in Body and Helth and Considering the mortality of my Body and that it is apointed once for all men to Die I therefore Constitute and apoint this my last wil and testiment and in the first place I will and Bequeath unto my well Beloved Wife Mary Camp if she the said many Should proove to be the Longest Liver (all my Estate Both Rarall and personal all during her natural Liffe for her soport and as I hereby do Constitute and apoint my well beloved son Abner Camp my whole and sole Execeter in law of my whole Estate Both reall and personall I allso apoint sd Abner Camp at my Deces to take my wife mary with all and singular ofmy Estate into his Cear and Keeping and that he the sd Abner Shall soprt and maintain the sd Mary Camp during her natural Life in a Comfortable way or manner of my Estate and after the Deces of my wife Mary and after my Lawful Debts is or shall be paid I give and Bequeth all my Estate both reall and personal wit all Bils and Bonds and other Debts to be devided in manner and form following to wit after the Deces of my self and my wife Mary Camp do Constitute and apoint my Executer Abner Camp to Expose to sale to the Best advantage all my Estate that .....(torn) Leave behind me in this world and makering an Equal Devide with ..(torn) . Children Exept my sone Thos Camp which has REcieved from me all.. (torn)

Page 2
Ever intend to give him also Wilm Camp has recieved from me all I Ever will give him also my daughters Salley Gradon and Anniomey Hill and Winey Kinmon the several above named person I Do these presants Exemp from Every obtaing any parte or parcel of my Extate but my will and Desier is that after the Execeter Recieved sattisfaction out of my Extate for all trouble and Expence that he the sd Execter Abner Camp may be to pay to Each Legatee their Eaquil part whose names ar here written whom I own as my Lawful Legatees to witt my son James Camp Starling Camp Abner camp and my daughter Kiziah Arnold in witness and testimoney hereof I hereunto do set my hand and afix my seal this 29th Day of Dec.r 1818. " [copy of original provided by Jennifer O'Kelley 3/30/08] 
Camp John
 
222 He left Clayton County, GA soon after the Civil War and went to Texas with some of his children. Camp John
 
223 I've always had this address, must be someone else.
Seaborn was the son of John and Winifred Maddox
Camp. John was nicknamed "BigHeaded John" and
was the son of James and Mary Berry Camp.
James was the son of John and Mary Tarpley Camp
who was the son of Thomas Camp of Rutherford County,
North Carolina from whom so many of us descend.

I am reeling this off the top of my head now, there are
many others on this list far more knowledgeable than I...
It is thought that John Camp left Princeton, South Carolina
soon after the death of Mary Tarpley Camp (who was
buried in the old cemetery of Lebanon Methodist Church)
Obviously, some of his children migrated with him. There
are several references to a John Camp in the Jackson County (GA)
deed records. When John (husband of Mary Tarpley)died it was thought he was
taken
back to SC, but he was buried in Georgia. There is a James Camp listed in
the
1820 Gwinnet County GA Census, which is presumably my
Seaborn Camp's grandfather, James. BigHeaded John left
Clayton County soon after the end of the Civil War and went
to Texas with some of his other children. Seaborn's first wife
was Mahaley Beavers and his second wife Elizabeth Parrish.
Elizabeth's mother was Elizabeth Mitchell, daughter of Hinchey
Mitchell who shared ancestry with Margaret Mitchell (You'd
think that could help us preserve the cemetery!). Seaborn was
too old to serve in the regular Confederate Army, so he served
in the GA militia instead. My great aunt, Omi, told me many
stories of life during the Civil War as her father, John Thomas
Camp, son of Seaborn and Elizabeth, recalled. Seaborn died
in 1900 and Aunt Omi wasn't born until 1907, but she did know
Elizabeth, the second wife, Omi's grandmother. Hope this
helps. If you'd like I can post dates and children, but Barbara
has everything on the CAMP page. 
Camp Sarah
 
224 Not sure if she married William Glass the son of William and Sarah McKissack or did she marry William the son of James Glass and Mary Clower. Carlton Levonia Parthenia
 
225 Name: Daniel CARRINGTON
Given Name: Daniel
Surname: Carrington
Suffix: Sr. 1 2 3 4
Sex: M
Birth: 25 Dec 1776 in Loudoun County, Virginia 1 2 3 4
Death: Bet 1860 and 1870 in Wilkes County, Georgia 5 6 7
Event: Land 1803 Wilkes County, Georgia
Note:
[WILKES COUNTY, GEORGIA] LOTTERY OF 1803

The land given out in this lottery was obtained from the Creek Indians in a treaty at Fort Wilkinson, June 16, 1802, and included "the Territory south of the Oconee and Altamaha rivers". This land was divided into three counties, Wayne, Wilkinson and Baldwin. The lots in Wayne consisted of 490 acres each, those in Baldwin and Wilkinson 202 1/2 acres each, three thousand two hundred and forty acres reserved for a town to be called Milledgeville.

Those entitled to draw were every free white male twenty-one years and upwards, and an inhabitant of the state twelve months immediately preceding the passage of this act, who had paid tax, one draw; every free white male having a wife and one or more legitimate children, two draws; all widows having legitimate child or children, two draws; all families of orphans having no parents living, two draws.

No mention is made of military service in this act, and no provision is made for soldiers of any war.

Georgia, Wilkes Co. We the Justices of the Inferior Court viz: Benjamin Porter, James Anthony, Thomas Mounger and Richard Worsham having met the 13th day of June 1803 at the court house agreeable to the Governors Proclamation for the purpose of receiving the names of the inhabitants of the county and the draws to which they are entitled by an Act of the General Assembly passed May 11, last, Do hereby certify that the persons hereinafter named are entitled to the number of draws designated by the figures one and two opposite their names, viz:

Drawer's Name and Number of Draws Allowed

Carrington, Daniel 2

Extracted from The Early Records of Georgia, Volume I, Wilkes County, page 301.
8
Event: Estate 16 Jan 1811 Wilkes County, Georgia
Note:
Daniel and his father-in-law were named as executors of the following estate:

Page 50--ALBERT, JOSEPH. Horse, saddle, books, etc., to be sold. Residue to children, Sally, Johnny, William and Tommy Albert. Friends John Callaway, Sr., and Daniel Carrington, Excrs. Signed Jan. 16, 1811. Probated Mar. 4, 1811. John Hingson, Joseph Adnes (?), Test.

Extracted from The Early Records of Georgia, Volume I, Wilkes County, page 80.
9
Event: Land 1819 Wilkes County, Georgia
Note:
[WILKES COUNTY, GEORGIA] LAND LOTTERY OF 1819

The land given out in this lottery was obtained from the Creek and Cherokee Indians by the United States in several treaties, one at Fort Jackson, Aug. 9, 1814, and one at the Cherokee Agency, July 8, 1817, and one at the Creek Agency on Flint river, Jan. 22, 1818, and included the original boundaries of Early, Irwin, Appling, Walton, Hall, Gwinnett, and Habersham counties. The land lots in Irwin and Appling counties contained 490 acres each, in the others 250 acres each. Those entitled to draw were every free white male eighteen years of age and upwards, being a citizen of the United States and an inhabitant of this state three years immediately preceding this act, and all who served as drafted men or volunteers in the late Indian War, provided they had resided and continue to reside in this state since said service was performed, one draw; all officers and soldiers of the Revolutionary War who are indigent or invalid, two draws in addition to those heretofore authorized by law; should they have been fortunate drawers in previous lotteries, one draw; every male person of like description having a wife or legitimate male child or children under eighteen years, or unmarried female child or children, two draws; all widows with like residence one draw; all widows or orphans of soldiers killed in the late wars with Great Britian and the Indians, one draw, in addition to those already allowed widows and orphans by this act; all families of orphans under twenty-one years old whose father is dead, one draw; all orphans whose father and mother are both dead, two draws. Any citizen of the state who was legally drafted in the late war against Great Britain and the Indians who refused to serve either in person or by substitute, or who evaded a draft by leaving the state or county in which they resided, were not entitled to draw.

This act was amended Dec. 21, 1819 to include territory acquired of the Cherokee Indians by a treaty held by John C. Calhoun at the City of Washington Feb. 27, 1819, which was the original Rabun county, the lots to contain 490 acres each.

MAJ. J. HERD'S BATT. CAPT. THOS. GORDON'S DISTRICT.

CAPT. BROOK'S DISTRICT.

....
Calloway, Joshua 2
Calloway, Luke J. 2
Calloway, John 2
Calloway, Enoch 2
Crews, James 2
Cunningham, Drury 2
Carrington, King 1
Carrington, Daniel 2
....

Georgia, Wilkes Co.

We do certify that the foregoing contains a list of persons who were applicants for draws in the present contemplated Land Lottery with the number of draws to which they are respectively entitled in Maj. Jesse Heard's Batt., in Wilkes Co. Given under our hands the 15th day of March 1819.

RICHARD HUDSPETH,
GEORGE M. WALKER,
Receivers.

Extracted from The Early Records of Georgia, Volume I, Wilkes County, page 338.
10
Event: Census Report 1820
Note:
State: GA; County: Wilkes; Dist: unk;
Enumerator: John Sanders, Asst. Marshall;
Roll M33_9; Image:0289; Line: 35; Page: 187
===================================
Head of Household: Danl Carrington
.White Males: 2 (under 10), 2 (10-16), 1 (26-35), 1(35-45);
White Females: 2 (under 10), 1 (16-26), 1 (35-45);
.. ........ Slaves: 3
1
Event: Land 1821
Note:
Daniel successfully drew land in the 1821 Georgia Land Lottery as follows:

Carrington, Daniel Wilkes Hudspeths 128/9 Henry
11
ORDN: 1826 Wilkes County, Georgia
Note:
Sardis Baptist Church (originally Hutton's Fork Church).

John, Callaway, Daniel's father-in-law, was probably a charter member of Sardis Baptist Church. Daniel was ordained as a minister just three years after this brother-in-law, Enoch Callaway, was ordained in 1823. Enoch served as pastor of Sardis Church from 1828-1859, his son, B. M. Callaway, served as pastor 1870-1902; and his grandson, E. A. Callaway served as clerk of Sardis Church for over forty years.

Daniel Carrington served as pastor of Bethany Baptist Church.
12
Event: Tax Digest 1825-1829 Wilkes County, Georgia
Note:


Notes from the Wilkes County Tax Digests

1825 - Daniel Carrington owned 320 acres of land on Long Creek adjoining Adams and originally granted to Appling.

Daniel Carrington was Trustee for the administration of the estate of his father, Rev. Timothy Carrington, consisting of 250 acres of land in Early County, 11th District, #240.

1826 - Daniel Carrington owned 320 acres of land on Long Creek originally granted to J. Whitaker (different from the land he owned in 1825), and he is still Trustee for his late father's land in Early County.

1828 - Daniel Carrington's land adjoined that of E. Callaway.

1829 - Daniel still owned the same property as above and was still administrator of his late father's estate. He was also the administrator for Timothy Carrington, minor, for 202.5 acres of land in Troup County, #155.
Event: Census Report 1830
Note:
State: GA; County: Wilkes; Dist: 166; Enumerator: Charles R. Carten;
Roll: M19_21; Image: 0604; Line: 24; Page: 306
===================================
Head of Household: Daniel Carrington
...White Males: 1 (5-10), 2 (10-15). 1 (50-60);
White Females: 1 (10-15), 1 (15-20), 1 (50-60)
............Slaves: 11
............Males: 2 (0-10);
.........Females: 4 (0-10), 3 (24-36), 1 (36-55), 1 (55-100);
....Agriculture: 18
2
Event: Census Report 1840
Note:
State: GA; County: Wilkes; Dist: 166; Enumerator: James F. Hay;
Roll: M704_53; Image: 0254; Line: 4; Page: 272
===================================
Head of Household: Daniel Carrington
Males: 1 (60-70); Females: 1 (60-70)
13
Event: Census Report 1850
Note:
Carrington, Daniel, 73, Farmer, property value $1,000, b VA
Carrington, Nancy, 72, b VA
14
Event: Note 1854 Wilkes County, Georgia
Note: Rev. George White in his book, Historical Collections of Georgia , written in 1854, stated in his section on the history of Wilkes County on pages 681-82: "...A few years ago there were living, Thomas Anderson, aged 81; William Williams, 90; Mrs. Sarah Freeman, 85; Thomas Talbot, 80; D. Carrington, 80...." 15
Event: Census Report 1860
Note:
Carrington, Daniel, 83, M, W, b VA
Carrington, Nancy, 83, F, W, b North Carolina
16
_UID: CB689C1EB91840B1B3C11617B1AF7D79A65D
Change Date: 7 Jul 2010 at 23:38
Note: See attached sources. 17

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1 possible matches found on Ancestry.com Ancestry.com


Father: Timothy CARRINGTON b: 1742
Mother: Winnifred "Winney" KING b: 16 Jul 1758 in Loudoun County, Virginia

Marriage 1 Nancy CALLAWAY b: 1778 in Virginia
Married: 6 Aug 1799 in Wilkes County, Georgia 18 19
Change Date: 17 Feb 2010
Children
Has No Children Thomas Callaway CARRINGTON
Has No Children Felix C. CARRINGTON b: 1815 in Wilkes County, Georgia
Has No Children Daniel CARRINGTON
Has Children Bethany CARRINGTON b: 1802-1803 in Wilkes County, Georgia
Has No Children Winnie C. CARRINGTON
Has No Children Jincey CARRINGTON
Has Children Nancy C. CARRINGTON b: 1809-1810 in Wilkes County, Georgia 
Carrington Daniel
 
226 Name: Henson T. CARRINGTON
Given Name: Henson T.
Surname: Carrington
Suffix: Sr. 1 2 3
Name: HENDERSON
Given Name:
Surname: Henderson
Sex: M
Birth: 25 Dec 1780 in Wake County, North Carolina 1 2 3
Note: Probably In North Carolina
Death: Bef 15 Feb 1834 in Madison County, Georgia 4 5 6 7 8
Event: Birth Note
Note: Born About 10:00 Pm 9
Event: Land Lottery Land 1805
Note:
Henson registered for a draw in the 1805 Georgia Land Lottery as follows:

Carrington, Hinson431BElbert

[He did not win any land]
Event: Land Lottery Land 1807
Note:
Henson successfully drew land in the 1807 Goergia Land Lottery as follows:

Carrington, HensonElbertGroves249/9Wilkinson
10
Event: War of 1812 Military Service 1812 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Henson Carrington served in the military enlisting as follows:
War of 1812 Service Records


Name: Henson Carrington
Company: 4 REGIMENT (BOOTH'S), GEORGIA MILITIA.
Rank - Induction: PRIVATE
Rank - Discharge: PRIVATE
Roll Box: 35
Roll Exct: 602
11
Event: Purchase Land 18 Jan 1812 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Ga.: 18 Jan 1812, James Cargill of Randolph Co. to Henson Carrington of Madison Co., for $200, 400 acres in Madison Co. on waters of Broad River, granted to said James Cargill 7 Jun 1797. (signed) James Cargill. Test: Robert Floyd, Timothy Carrington. Rec. 25 Mar 1812.

From. Madison County, Georgia, Deed Book A, 1812-1818, p 6
12
Event: Tax Digest 1817 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
The transcribed tax digest appeared in the Georgia Genealogical Magazine Vol. 33, No. 2-3 (Issues 128-129), Spring/Summer 1993, p 131-43:

Tax Receiver: James Bradberry
Repository: Georgia Department of Archives and History, Drawer #172, Box #48.
[abbr: a=acres, BB, BR, SS, etc.= abbr for water course the land adjoined, n=no. of taxable negroes, unk=unknown to whom land was originally granted]

"Captain Orr District"

On p 19
Henson Carrington, 409 1/2a, BR, J. Cargill, adjoined J. Simes.
13
Event: Deed of Sale Land 22 Oct 1818 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Madison Co., Ga.: 22 Oct 1818, Henson Carrington to Elijah Sorrow, both of Madison Co., for $100, tract in Madison Co. on waters of Broad River adj. Denis Hopkins and others, 100 Ła acres, beg. red oak cor., N52E 48 ch. 25 links to red oak cor., S49E 2 ch. to chestnut cor., S50W to post oak cor., S37E 10 ch. to hickory cor., N55E 6 ch. to ash cor., N80E 14 ch. 75 links to birch cor., N22E 12 ch. 56 links to poplar cor., N10E 9 ch. to maple cor., N43E 8 ch. to ash cor., N30W 22 ch. to beg. (signed) Henson Carrington. Wit: Timothy Carrington, Micajah (x) Carrington. Proved by Micajah (x) Carrington 1 Jan 1821, Robert Groves, J.P. Rec. 16 Jan 1821.

From: Madison County, Georgia, Deed Book BDE, 1818-1828, page 211.
Event: Census Report 1820
Note:
State: GA; Co.: Madison; Dist: unk;
Enumerator: John Sanders, Asst. Marshall;
Roll M33_9, Image 0079, LN 24, Page 52
===================================
Head of household: Henson Carrington
....White males: 4 (0-10), 1 (10-16), 1 (26-45);
White Females: 1 (0-10), 2 (10-16), 1 (26-45);
............Slaves: 0
.....Agriculture: 3

Henson and his family lived two doors down from his parents, Rev. Timothy and Winnifred (King) Carrington.
1
Event: Tax Return Court 17 Jul 1821 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
The following Legal Notice appeared in The Georgia Journal, Milledgeville, Georgia on Jul 17, 1821:

"Georgia, Madison County. HINSON CARRINGTON...tolls before DAVID EVANS, Esq., a chesnut sorrel mare...9 or 10 years old...branded on the near shoulder with (J.C.)...appraised by THOMAS EVANS and JABEZ FLOYD, to $40. (Signed) WILLIS TOWNS, Clerk."
14
Event: Deed of Sale Land 2 Dec 1822 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Madison Co., Ga.: 2 Dec 1822, Henson Carrington to Jas. Jarrell, both of Madison Co., for $50, tract in Madison Co. on waters of South Broad River, 150 acres, beg. chestnut cor., N4W 24 ch. to pine cor., S35W 20 ch. to parsimmon cor., N62E to the old road leading from the Augusta Road, W. W. Willefords', down old road to where the said old orig. line crosses, along sd. line S50W to beg. (signed) Henson Carrington. Wit: Geo. Jarrell, David Evans, J.P. Rec. 26 Feb 1823.

From: Madison County, Georgia, Deed Book BDE, 1818-1828, page 290.
Event: Tax Return Court 20 May 1823 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
The following Legal Notice appeared in The Georgie Journal, Milledgeville, Georgia on May 20, 1823:

"Georgia, Madison County. Clerk's Office, Inferior Court.--HENSON CARRINGTON...posted before JEREMIAH HALL, Esq., on the 19th April last, one black mare...a star in her forehead, 12 or 13 years old...appraised to $30.00...(Signed) WILLIS TOWNS, Clerk."
15
Event: Land Grant Land 4 Aug 1823 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Plat Book Page: 35
Name: CARRINGTON Henson
Acres: 282
Date of Warrant: 4 Aug 1823
Date Surveyed:23 Aug 1823
Date Advertised: 1 Sep 1823
Year of Grant:1825
Grant Book: P-5
Page: 332
16
Event: Deed of Sale Land 14 Feb 1824 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Madison Co., Ga.:14 Feb 1824, Henson Carington to Stephen White, both of Madison Co., for $50, tract in Madison Co. on waters of south prong of Broad River, 10 acres, part of a 282 acre tract granted to Henson Carington the 3rd day of the month and year above written, beg. black oak, N52E 35 ch. 25 links to hickory, S2W 7 ch. 20 links to pine, S68W 29 ch. 60 links to beg., adj. D. Hopkins, S. White. (signed) Henson Carington. Wit: Benjamin Smith, Lewis Simms, J.I.C. Rec. 7 Jan 1826.

From: Madison County, Georgia, Deed Book BDE, 1818-1828, page 466.
Event: Deed of Sale Land 14 Feb 1825 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Madison Co., Ga.: 14 Feb 1825, Henson Carrington to Henry P. White, both of Madison Co., for $114, 100 acres adj. H. P. White, James Thompson, William Thompson & others, part of a tract granted to myself, beg. pine, S5W 1 ch. 75 links to black gum cor., on James Thompson's line S69W 7 ch. 68 links to black oak cor., on William Thompson's line N20E 24 ch. to post oak cor., on William Thompson's line N71W 11 ch. 30 links to post oak cor., N21E 35 ch. 65 links to black jack, S36E 68 ch. 29 links to black oak, on Stephen White's line S68W 13 ch. 25 links to hickory cor., N25W 5 ch. to hickory cor., S76W 24 ch. 85 links to beg., on waters of South Fork of Broad River. (signed) Henson Carrington. Wit: Benjamin Smith, Lewis Simms, J.I.C. Polly (x) Carrington, wife of Henson Carrington, relinquishes her dower, 22 Jul 1825. Rec. 9 Nov 1825.

From: Madison County, Georgia, Deed Book BDE, 1818-1828, page 456.
Event: Family Note of Interest 1827 Wilkes County, Georgia
Note: Henson was mentioned in the 1827 Estate Return for his deceased father-in-law, Isaac Whitaker. 17
Event: Census Report 1830 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
State: GA; County: Madison; Dist: not stated; Enumerator: John Sanders;
Roll: M19_19; Image: 0207; Line: 14; Page: 109
===================================
Head of Household: Henson Carrington
....White Males: 2 (0-5), 2 (10-15), 2 (15-20), 1 (20-30), 1 (50-60);
White Females: 2 (5-10), 1 (10-15), 2 (20-30), 1 (40-50);
............Slaves: 0
.....Agriculture: 14
2
Event: Land 1832 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Henson won 3 land lots in the 1832 Gold lottery in Georgia:
Land lot 525 of Dist 3, Sec.4,
land lot 712, of Dist 11,sec.1 ;
land lot 768 of Dist 1,sec 4,Madison Co. Ga
Land lot 748-19,Cherokee Co..
Event: Estate 1 Jun 1843 Madison County, Georgia
Note: Personally appeared Augustus G. Carrington, Admr. of estate of Henson Carrington deceased to claim lot 716-10 and lot 712-11-1. Tully H. appointed agent. Signed Augustus G. Carrington before James McCurdy, JP, 3RD June 1,1843.
_UID: A98F549707934B8287530B1C64EC6D7AC24C
Change Date: 26 Mar 2012 at 21:48

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1 possible matches found on Ancestry.com Ancestry.com


Father: Timothy CARRINGTON b: 1742
Mother: Winnifred "Winney" KING b: 16 Jul 1758 in Loudoun County, Virginia

Marriage 1 Mary H. "Polly" WHITAKER b: 1790 in North Carolina
Married: in Wilkes County, Georgia 9
Change Date: 17 Feb 2010
Children
Has Children Lavinia CARRINGTON b: 30 Aug 1805 in Elbert County, Georgia
Has Children Augustus Guy CARRINGTON b: 1809 in Elbert County, Georgia
Has No Children Pervella CARRINGTON b: 1810 in Elbert County, Georgia
Has No Children Pittman CARRINGTON b: 1815 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children Henson T. CARRINGTON b: 1816 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children Harrison W. CARRINGTON b: 1818 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children William Perry "Perry" CARRINGTON b: 20 Dec 1819 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children Mahuldah CARRINGTON b: 1826 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children John Madison Dooley CARRINGTON b: 20 Apr 1827 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children Sarah Elizabeth CARRINGTON b: 1828 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children Daniel C. CARRINGTON b: 28 Jan 1829 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children Kitty CARRINGTON b: 1831 in Madison County, Georgia 
Carrington Henson T.
 
227 ID: I32
?Name: Sarah H. LESTER
?Given Name: Sarah H.
?Surname: Lester 1 2 3 4 5
?Name: CARRINGTON
?Given Name:
?Surname: Carrington
?Sex: F
?Birth: 1797 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia 2 6 4 5
?Death: Bet 1870 and 1880 in Washington County, Texas
?Burial: Washington County, Texas 2 6
?Event: Land 22 Oct 1844 Washington County, Texas
?Note: Sarah purchased from William Hensley, heir of Hirman Hensley, 113Ła acres for $400 plus financing, for a total of $1,854. This land was part of the Hirman Hensley League (originally 300 acres). 7 8
?Event: Tax Digest 1846 Washington County, Texas
?Note: Sarah was listed on the tax digest, as was one of her sons, O. P. Carrington. 9
?Event: Census Report 1850 Washington County, Texas
?Note:
Reel # M432-918. p 284
Enumerated Sep 25, 1850 by E. D. Little:

Ln 17 Hn 3 Fn 3 Carrington, O. P. 24 M Grocer $2,000 b GA
18 S A C 40 F GA
19 Frances 20 F GA
20 Sophia 11 F GA
10
?Event: Land 14 Aug 1857 Bosque County, Texas
?Note:
Land grant: Aug 14, 1857, Bosque Co, TX.
Abst# 897,
no surv #,
640 acs,
file#1107.
patent #1771,
vol 9,
Certificate 204,
Patentee Sarah Carrington
7
?Event: Census Report 1860 Washington County, Texas
?Note:
p 10
Enumerated Jun 4, 1860 by F. Harris:
Household #51, family #51
=================================================================
O. P. Carrington 35 M Barkpr $10000 $5000 GA
Adaline Carrington 28 F GA
John Carrington 6 M TX
Thomas Carrington 4 M TX
M. Rainwater 64 F SC
Sarah Carrington 58 F GA

M. Rainwater was Adaline's mother, and Sarah Carrington was O. P.'s mother.
11 12 13 14
?Event: Census Report 1870 Washington County, Texas
?Note:
Roll: M593_1608; Image: 332; Page: 166
State: Texas; County: Washington; Precinct: 4; P.O.: Brenham
Enumerated Sep 23, 1870 by B. J. Arnold
=================================================================
10 1166 1166 Lyon, B. F. 55 M W Farmer $2200 $450 GA
11 1166 1166 Lyon, Mary 50 F W Hkpng GA
12 1166 1166 Lyon, Oliver 18 M W Farmer TX
13 1166 1166 Lyon, Adaline 18 F W School TX
14 1166 1166 Lyon, Amanda 13 F W School TX
15 1166 1166 Lyon, John 9 M W School TX
16 1166 1166 Carrington, Sarah 73 F W Hkpng GA
15
?_UID: 1A4FAD9D0B9E4997AB2390C0A147EA0A36CB
?Change Date: 28 Sep 2011 at 01:02




Father: Alexander L. LESTER b: 8 Aug 1775 in Chesterfield County, Virginia
Mother: Martha COUSINS b: Abt 1775 in Chesterfield County, Virginia

Marriage 1 John CARRINGTON b: 1791 in Georgia?Married: 15 May 1818 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia 1
?Change Date: 28 Sep 2011
Children1.Has Children Mary A. CARRINGTON b: 9 Jul 1820 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
2.Has No Children Stephen CARRINGTON b: Abt 1822 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
3.Has No Children Daughter 2 CARRINGTON b: Abt 1823 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
4.Has No Children Son 2 CARRINGTON b: Abt 1825 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
5.Has No Children Amanda CARRINGTON b: Abt 1828 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
6.Has No Children Frances CARRINGTON b: 1830 in Coweta County, Georgia
7.Has Children Oliver P. CARRINGTON b: 20 Feb 1832 in Coweta County, Georgia
8.Has No Children Sophia CARRINGTON b: 1839 in Texas

 
Carrington John
 
228 Name: John CARRINGTON
Given Name: John
Surname: Carrington 1 2 3 4 5 6
Sex: M
Birth: 1791 in Georgia 1 2 3 4 5 6
Death: Bef 1844 in Texas 6
Burial: Texas 7 3 2
Event: Census Report 1820
Note:
State: GA; County: Oglethorpe; Dist: Lexington;
Enumerator:unkn;
Roll M33_7; Image: 0183; Line: 26; Page: 174
===================================
Head of Household: John Carington [sic]
...White males: 1 (26-45)
White females: 1 (under 10); 1 (16-26)
....Agriculture: 1
1
Event: Land 1821 Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Note: In the 1821 Land Lottery of Georgia, John Carrington of Militia District 235 of Oglethorpe County, Georgia drew Land Lot 248 of the 10th Dist. in Houston County. and also Land Lot 52 of the 10th Dist. in Dooly County. 8 9
Event: Tax Digest 1828 Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Note: John was listed on the 1828 Tax Digest. 10
Event: Court Record 1828 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
John was first appointed guardian of the minor children of his sister Winnifred K. (Carrington) Thompson and her absent husband, Alexander Thompson, at the September 1828 Session of the Inferior Court of Ordinary of Madison County, Georgia, per page 101 of Minutes of Inferior Count for Ordinary Purposes, Book A 1812-1848:

"Orderdered [sic] that John Carrington be & he is hereby appointed to [sic] Guardian to the persons & estate of William Abigail James & Alexander Thompson, minors of Alexander Thompson (absent) and Kinchen Strickland came in to court and bound himself in the sum of Two Thousand dollars, for the faithfull [sic] performance of the above trust."
11
Event: Land 1829 Coweta County, Georgia
Note: In the 1827 Georgia Land Lottery as a Revolutionary War widow, Winnifred (King) Carrington won land lot 71 of the 5th district of Coweta County. She sold this 202Ła-acre property to her son John Carrington on September 15, 1829. Witnesses were two of her other sons Osborne and William Carrington. 12
Emigration: Abt 1829 Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Note:
John moved his family to Coweta County, circa 1829/1830 from Oglethorpe County, Georgia. Contrary to what some other researchers believed, this move occurred after he purchased the 202Ła acres from his mother. By 1830 John was operating a merchandising store in Coweta, and being popular and well liked he was elected Tax Collector. Unfortunately, in 1835 John embezzled some of the tax monies, or at least was charged as so doing, and fled the county. His bondsman had to make good on the missing funds.

The Thompson children stayed in the Harris County area, married and had families of thier own. Members of William W. Carrington's family were living near these Thompson descendants in the mid and late 1800's.
3
Event: Court Record Abt 1830 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Minutes of the Inferior Court Sitting for Ordinary Purposes stated on page 111:

"...and the return of John Carrington Guardian for the minor heirs of Alexander Thompson, absent, from the year 1828 be recorded."
13
Event: Census Report 1830 Coweta County, Georgia
Note:
John and Sarah were enumerated in the 1830 census, p. 378, as follows:

Males: 2 (under 5), 1 (5-10), 1 (30-40);
Females: 1 (under 5), 2 (5-10), 1 (30-40).
14
Event: Court Record 1830 Coweta County, Georgia
Note: John witnessed someone's will that was probated and recorded in Will Book A, 1827-1847, page 2 in 1830 in Coweta County, Georgia. 15
Event: Land 1830 Coweta County, Georgia
Note: On April 14, 1830, John Carrington purchased from William Nesbit 202Ła acres, being Land Lot 33, 2nd District. 16
Event: Court Record 1831
Note: On Nov. 7, 1831, John was appointed guardian of William, Abigail, James, and Alexander Thompson, the children of Alexander and Winny Carrington Thompson in Madison County, according to Annual Returns A, p. 186 and 204 of Coweta County. Another document pertaining to guardianship is in Coweta County. Administrators and Guardians Bonds, Book A, 1830-1837, p. 7. [John and Winny Carrington were brother and sister.] 17 6
Event: Court Record 1832 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Minutes of the Inferior Court Sitting for Ordinary Purposes - September Term 1832, page 133:

"...and the return of John Carrington Guardian for the minor heirs of Alexander Thompson (absent), for the year 1829- be recorded."
18
Event: Land 1833 Coweta County, Georgia
Note:
On Dec 24, 1833, John Carrington purchased from James Garner and Shelton Eidson 202Ła acres, being Land Lot 96, 2nd District.

With the completion of this purchase, John had amassed 607Ła acres in a 5-year span.
19
Event: Note 1833 Coweta County, Georgia
Note: According to Coweta County, Georgia: Letters in Post Office, 1833, John Carrington had a letter there. 20
Event: Land 1830-1835 Coweta County, Georgia
Note:
While living in Coweta County, he apparently sold land, as well as purchased it, since he was listed three times as a "grantor" (seller) and once as a "grantee" (buyer) in the Deed Index (arranged alphabetically by grantor) as follows:

Georgia: Coweta County: Deed Index, Grantors, Surname C - 1827-1886

A 323 Carington, W Carington, I [sic] (should be "J") [This is the transaction where John purchased 202Ła acres from his mother]

A 385 Carington, John Hinton, John D

D 26 Carrington, John Hughens, Carey

I 127 Carrington, John Lee, Sanders W
21
Occupation: 1835 Coweta County, Georgia
Note: According to the Coweta Chronicles, John was a store keeper and tax collector for Coweta County in 1835; and after he collected the taxes that year, he absconded with the money. 2 6
Emigration: 1835 Texas 22
Event: Land 1836 Washington County, Texas
Note: John and Sarah and their family were in Texas by 1836. John was listed in the Index to Washington County Land Abstracts, Abstract #120. 23 24
Event: Estate 1848 Washington County, Texas
Note: Probate of John's estate began in 1848. He had minor children when he died, so his land was not sold until they were of age.
_UID: E61C45F9445145F487A7A8EA5E377ED3B497
Change Date: 28 Sep 2011 at 00:56
Note: See attached sources. 3



Father: Timothy CARRINGTON b: 1742
Mother: Winnifred "Winney" KING b: 16 Jul 1758 in Loudoun County, Virginia

Marriage 1 Sarah H. LESTER b: 1797 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Married: 15 May 1818 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia 25
Change Date: 28 Sep 2011
Children
Has Children Mary A. CARRINGTON b: 9 Jul 1820 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Has No Children Stephen CARRINGTON b: Abt 1822 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Has No Children Daughter 2 CARRINGTON b: Abt 1823 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Has No Children Son 2 CARRINGTON b: Abt 1825 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Has No Children Amanda CARRINGTON b: Abt 1828 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Has No Children Frances CARRINGTON b: 1830 in Coweta County, Georgia
Has Children Oliver P. CARRINGTON b: 20 Feb 1832 in Coweta County, Georgia
Has No Children Sophia CARRINGTON b: 1839 in Texas 
Carrington John
 
229 Name: Micajah CARRINGTON
Given Name: Micajah
Surname: Carrington 1 2 3 4
Sex: M
Birth: 8 Dec 1790 in Wilkes County, Georgia 1 2 3 4
Death: Dec 1880 in Coweta County, Georgia 1
Event: Background Coweta County, Georgia
Note:
Excerpts from History of Coweta County from 1825-1880
by W U Anderson

Page 13

1825 - Coweta County was formed out of a portion of the land purchased form the Creek Indians at a treaty held at the Indian Springs, in the county of Butts, in Georgia, on the 12th day of February, 1825, by David Meriwether and Duncan G Campbell, as commissioners on the part of the United States, General William McIntosh, Col. Hawkins and others, chiefs of the Indians, to sell the lands to the United States for Georgia. General McIntosh, Col. Hawkins and others were killed by the Indians for selling the lands belonging to the Indians to the whites; others would have been killed if they had not made their escape through a back window and swimming the Chattahoochee River in their night clothes to make good their escape. The killing of General McIntosh was in Carroll county, at the reserve, at McIntosh's own house.

Page 14

This will bring us to the location of the town of Newnan, which was done in February, 1828, and the lots sold on the 25th day of March, same year, ranging in prices from $611.50, the highest, down to $40.00, according to size and location. We are getting rather ahead of our business, we should first have given the name our town or city, and why it was named Newnan. It was named Newnan in honor of Gen. Daniel Newnan, who served in the revolutionary war, and was a distinguished officer in the war of 1812, and fought well with Jackson against the Indians. He was a native of North Carolina, but at the time of the location of our town and naming of it he was a citizen of Georgia, and in 1831 he was elected on the general ticket to Congress, and afterwards was made Adjutant General of Georgia, and died in Walker county at about 82 years of age. Every one should respect his name and honor him for his services, and the merits due such a soldier and statesman.

We now have our town laid off, lots sold and the name given it, and why it was given its name. We will now give the name of most or all of the first settlers up to the first three or four years of our county as far as can be recollected or can be procured from others. We will hold open a space for all information we can get from others, and to do justice, we will take it by districts, beginning with the first district up to the ninth. It will be rather dull reading, but it will remind all of many old friends that have been among us in times past, and we should cherish their memory for all time:

FIRST DISTRICT

Arthur Spince John Neal Willis Strengers
Cullen Harp Wm. Drake Micajah Carrington
Capt. W. Cole Thos. Drake
Richard Level Thos. Delk Moses P. Walker
Rev. Charles Level Bird Dilk Edward Williams
Simeon Watty Samuel Walker John Williams
Turner Persons Wily J. Bridges Isham Shell
John H. Tench Solomon Bridges Wm. B. Shell
Urquhart Richmond B. Bridges Mathew H. Wright
Dr. Urquhart A. Carmichael
Adam Summers John Murphy J. Y. Carmichael
Robert Russell E. Pass Wm. Carmichael
Wm. Russell Rob. J. H. Miller Patrick Carmichael
James Russell Turply Puckett
R. Y. Brown Jourdan Galaway Abraham Young, Sr.
James Brown Joseph Benton
John Hunter, Sr. Abraham Roberts A. Young, Jr.
Capt. John Hunter John D. Thurman James Young
Daniel Morgan John McCallum
William Baily Ezekiel Morgan Mathew Couch
James Bayly B.Billy Morgan Wm. W. Sillmon
David Lunch T. H. Billy Morgan Marshal Sheets
Burny Dunn Lud Fullerlove Ben Glover
Wm. G. Kalb James Gray John Endsly, R. S.
William Taylor Hasey Gray John Endsly, Jr.
Robert Neal Elijah Bengham Joseph Endsly
Tyra Harris Ben Tidwell Calib Ganeson
R. Beadenbagh Uriah Glass J. T. Emery
Rawles Stephen Dickson, Sr. Asa Herne
Rawles Dr. J. Head
Wm. S. Mayo Wm. W. Dickson Howel Elders
Payton Mayo Thos. G. Dickson A family of Creoles,
Calvin Wilkenson John Lee names forgot.
W. Westmoreland, Sr. Solomon Lee Rev. George B. Davis
James Garner
Dr. Wm. Westmoreland Elijah Garner David Dominick
Charles Garner John Anderson
m. Tidwell
Event: Census Report 1850
Note:
State: GA; County: Coweta; Div: 19.; PO:
Enumerated 9 August 1850 by B. H. Mitchell, Asst. Marshal
LN 26, HN 118, FN 118, Page: 775; Image: 0394; Roll: M432-66
===================================
Carrington...Micajuh [sic]...45...M...Farmer...GA...Illit
Carrington...Winniford........95...F..................VA...Pauper
Carrington...Sarah..............60...F..................NC...Illit
Carrington...Winneford.......22...F..................GA...Illit
Carrington ...Alices [sic]......7...M.................GA
5
Event: Tax Digest 1851 Coweta County, Georgia
Note: Micajah was listed on the 1851 Coweta County Tax Digest. 6
Event: Census Report 1870 Coweta County, Georgia
Note:
Micajah was enumerated for the 806th Dist. of Coweta County.:

M. Carrington 65 Farm Laborer born in Georgia
Winney Carrington 38 Kpg Hse born in Georgia
Zachariah Phillips 14 born in Georgia

[The Winney Carrington listed was a niece.]
Event: Census Report 1880 Coweta County, Georgia
Note: Micajah was enumerated in the 1880 census for the second dist. of Coweta County, Georgia, #189. He was 80 years old, a farmer, and born in Georgia He stated that his father was born in England and his mother in Virginia. Again living with Micajah was Winaford Carrington described as being his niece who was 41 years old and born in Georgia
Event: Death Note 1880 Coweta County, Georgia
Note:
"Coweta Deaths and Miscellaneous Notes 1828 - 1880"
from History of Coweta County from 1825-1880 by W U Anderson

1880

Mr Micajah Carrington, 81y
Event: Tax Digest 1845 Coweta County, Georgia
Note: 2nd District: Micajah Carrington, poll tax (owned no land). 7 
Carrington Micajah
 
230 Name: Osborne CARRINGTON
Given Name: Osborne
Surname: Carrington 1 2 3 4 5 6
Sex: M
Birth: 28 Sep 1786 in Wilkes County, Georgia 1 2 3 6 5
Death: Bet 1832 and 1840 in Madison County, Georgia 6 5 7 8 5
Event: Deed of Purchase Land 5 Sep 1816 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
William Williford, Sr. to Aborn Carrington, both of Madison Co., Ga., for $550, 195 acres in Madison Co. on waters of South Fork of Broad River, where said Williford now lives, part of a tract orig. granted to Richard Hubanks, beg. red oak cor. on Henry P. White's line, SW to post oak cor., along John H. Marks' line SE to an old tree cor., along Carrington's line NE to pine cor., along Stephen White's line NW to pine cor., along S. White's line to beg. (signed) William (x) Willeford. Wit: John Carrington, Thomas J. Nash, Timothy Carrington. Proved by Thomas J. Nash 28 Feb 1818, Robert Groves, J.P. Rec. 28 Feb 1818.

From: Madison County, Georgia, Deed Book BDE, 1818-1828, p 29.
Event: Tax Digest 1817 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
The transcribed tax digest appeared in the Georgia Genealogical Magazine Vol. 33, No. 2-3 (Issues 128-129), Spring/Summer 1993, p 131-43:

Tax Receiver: James Bradberry
Repository: Georgia Department of Archives and History, Drawer #172, Box #48.
[abbr: a=acres, BB, BR, SS, etc.= abbr for water course the land adjoined, n=no. of taxable negroes, unk=unknown to whom land was originally granted]

"Captain Orr District"

On p 20
Orsborn [sic] Carrington, 195a, BR, 1n, Hubanks, adjoined P. White.

[Osborne was listed directly above his father, Rev. Timothy.]
9
Event: Census Report 1820
Note:
State: GA; County: Madison; Dist: unk;
Enumerator: John Sanders, Asst. Marshall;
Roll M33_9; Image: unk; Line: 11; Page: 48
===================================
Head of Household: Orsborn [sic] Carrington
....White males: 3 (0-10), 1 (26-45);
White Females: 2 (0-10), 1 (16-26);
.....Agriculture: 2
............Slaves: 1
1
Event: Census Report 1830 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
State: GA; County: Madison; Dist: not stated; Enumerator: John Sanders;
Roll: M19_19; Image: 0215; Line: 2; Page: 113
===================================
Head of Household: Ozbon [sic] Carrington
...White Males: 1 (0-5), 2 (5-10), 2 (10-15), 1 (40-50);
White Females: 2 (0-5), 1 (5-10), 2 (10-15), 1 (30-40);
............Slaves: 4
............Males: 1 (10-24);
........Females: 2 (0-10), 1 (10-24);
...Agriculture: 16
2
Event: Land 1832
Note:
1832 Gold Lottery of Georgia: won two lots in Cherokee County,
land lot 581, dist 1, section 2, and land lot 1118, district 19, section 3
Event: Death Note 8 May 1843 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Osborn Carrington died before 1840 as documented by the fact that Mary Carrington was listed as head of her household on the 1840 Madison County, Georgia, census report. Osborn also died intestate as evidenced by the following verbatim quote from The Georgia Land Lottery Papers 1805-1914, by David and Lucas:

"Madison County: MARY CARRINGTON being sworn that ORSBURN CARRINGTON her husband drew Lot No. 1118-19-3 Cherokee when drawn and sd. ORSBURN CARRINGTON departed this life intestate and that above named Lot properly belongs to the sd. MARY CARRINGTON and his children legal representative of the sd. dec'd.
Dated: May 8.1843 Wit: JAMES R. WHITE J. P.
Signed: MARY (X) CARRINGTON
10
_UID: 4C3EF1A08F444A6F91CCA98F9F1D791F90DC
Change Date: 16 Jan 2012 at 19:24



Father: Timothy CARRINGTON b: 1742
Mother: Winnifred "Winney" KING b: 16 Jul 1758 in Loudoun County, Virginia

Marriage 1 Mary "Polly" THOMPSON b: Abt 1795 in Georgia
Married: 10 Aug 1810 in Oglethorpe County, Georgia 11 12
Change Date: 4 Feb 2010
Children
Has Children Harriett CARRINGTON b: 2 Jun 1811 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children Demirus CARRINGTON b: 28 Mar 1813 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children William D. CARRINGTON b: 1815 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children Micajah C. CARRINGTON b: 8 Dec 1818 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children Sarah CARRINGTON b: 1820 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children King William CARRINGTON b: Jan 1822 in Madison County, Georgia
Has No Children Emily CARRINGTON b: 1825 in Madison County, Georgia
Has Children Martha CARRINGTON b: Mar 1827 in Madison County, Georgia
Has No Children James CARRINGTON b: Abt 1828 in Madison County, Georgia
Has No Children Tolbert Hugh CARRINGTON b: Abt 1829 in Madison County, Georgia
Has No Children Nancy CARRINGTON b: Abt 1830 in Madison County, Georgia
 
Carrington Osborne
 
231 Name: Sarah "Salley" CARRINGTON
Given Name: Sarah "Salley"
Surname: Carrington
Sex: F
Birth: 30 Jun 1783 in Wake County, North Carolina 1 2 3
Death: Bet 1840 and 1850 in Georgia 4
Event: was mentioned in the will of Dabney Gholston, probated in Court Record 1825 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Sarah was mentioned in the will of Dabney Gholston, probated in 1825 in Madison County, Georgia:

"To Miss Sarah Carrington for due attendance to me in all my sickness and for other work and services in my family should be paid out of my estate $300."

Recorded: Madison County, Georgia Will Book A, p. 25, signed June 13, 1824, recorded March 23, 1825)
5
Event: Census Report 1830 Madison County, Georgia
Note:
Sarah was living with her mother, Winnifred "Winney" (King) Carrington and her widowed sister, Winnifred K. "Winny" (Carrington) Thompson, who was listed as the head of household, and sister Winny's four children, as follows:

Males: 2 (10-15)-William & Alexander, 1 (15-20)-James;
Females: 1 (5-10)-Winneford?*, 1 (15-20)-Abigail, 1 (30-40)-Winny Thompson, 1 (40-50)-Sarah "Salley" Carrington, 1 (70-80)-Winney (King) Carrington

*The parentage of this young girl is undocumented, but she might have been Sarah Carrington's illegitimate daughter.
Event: Census Report 1840 Coweta County, Georgia
Note:
Sarah was enumerated in the second district, p. 344 as the head of the household, along with her elderly mother as follows:

Males: None listed;
Females: 1 (10-15)*, 1 (50-60)-Sarah; 1 (80-90)-Winnifred "Winney" (King) Carrington

* The 10-15 year-ol female was probably the Winneford Carrington who was living in the 1850 household of Micajah Carrington in Coweta County, Georgia, along with Sarah Carrington and Winnifred "Winney" (King) Carrington. The parentage of this young girl is undocumented, but she might have been Sarah Carrington's illegitimate daughter. 
Carrington Sarah
 
232 WILL: Rev. Timothy Carrington - 1822 - Madison County, GA

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Submitted by - Diane Carrington Bradford - wdbradford@mindspring.com
8 March 2002
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Estate Records of Rev. Timothy Carrington
Submitted by: Diane Carrington Bradford
wdbradford@mindspring.com

Rev. Timothy Carrington died intestate in Madison County, Georgia, in
September 1822. His eldest son, Daniel, became administrator of his father's
estate. The tax digests from 1825-30 show that Daniel as the trustee of
Timothy's estate administration and that Timothy owned 250 acres in Early
County, Georgia, land lot 240 of the 11th district-land probably received in
a land lottery.

The estate settlement papers were filed in October 1822 in Madison County,
and were recorded Oct. 17, 1822, in Book B-C-D, p 266-268.

GEORGIA, Madison Co. We the undersigned being the heirs and legal
representatives of the Reverend Timothy Carrington late of said County
deceased do agree as respects what worldly estate the said Timothy
Carrington died possessed of in the manner following. To wit in the first
place we agree that Micajah Carrington shall have the horse, saddle, and
bridle commonly known as his horse also one bed & furniture and one cow and
calf with the present crops on the plantation. We agree that Charles
Sorrells, James Thompson, Henry P. White, Sen., Stephen Smith and Dennis
Hopkins shall and are hereby appointed any three of them to say wether [sic]
a yoke of oxen which was broke and worked by the said Micajah shall be and
belong to the said Micajah Carrington or weather [sic] they shall be and
become a part of the estate of said deceased & the decission [sic] of the
above arbitration shall be final and conclusive. We also agree that Sally
Carrington shall have one cow and calf, one bed & furniture, one pine chest,
one cotton wheel, and one chair. We also further agree that the plantation
whereon the deceased formerly lived as well as a lot drawn in the land
lottery, also tools of every description, stock and everything belonging to
said estate excepting two beds & furniture shall and is hereby given up unto
the hands of Daniel Carrington for the purpose of selling to the highest
bidder on a reasonable credit the money arising from the sale of said estate
in the first place to the payment of all just debts in the next place to the
support of Winneford [sic] Carrington the widow of said deceased and the
third place at the death of said Winneford {sic] Carrington widow of said
deceased we agree that the balance of the said estate or money belonging to
said estate shall be equally divided between the lawful heirs and legatees
of said deceased and provided all sale of said land cannot be affected then
to be rented out until such time afterwards a sale can be affected either by
publick [sic] or private sale which he the said Daniel Carrington may
consider to the most advantage of said estate and we also agree that at
whatever time a sale of said land may take place we authorize the said
Daniel Carrington to make use of and sign each and every one of our names to
any instrument of writing which may be necessary for securing the title
thereof to the purchaser of said land or lands the same as if we were
present and acted for ourselves hereby ratifying and confering whatever the
said Daniel Carrington may do in the premises. We also further agree that
the two beds & furniture already excepted shall be given up unto the hands
of said Winneford Carrington widow of said deceased to have and to use as
her own right and property during her natural life & at her death to despose
[sic] of in any way or manner she may think proper. In witness whereof we
have hereunto set our hands & seals this the 24 September 1822. (Interlined
with the word (& one & calf between the ___ & seventh lines from the top
before). [This last sentence must refer to the wording of the document.]
Done in the presence of

Test:

Stephen Smith

Burrell Orr

David Evans JP

Signed:

Winnifred Carrington

Daniel Carrington

Henson Carrington

Sally Carrington

Osborn Carrington

Winnifred Thompson

William Carrington

Micajah Carrington

Thomas J. Nash

John Carrington

N B & also we the undersigned to the foregoing agreement touching all the
matters & things relative to the management & arrangement of the estate of
the Reverend Timothy Carrington late of Madison County deceased do by these
presents firmly bind ourselves each to the others in the just & full sum of
five hundred dollars to be recovered as all other legal demands may be if
default be made by us or any of us in the aforesaid agreement as hereto have
entered on the 24th day of September 1822. Given under our hands this the
28th day of September 1822.

Test: Signed

Stephen Smith

Burrell Orr

David Evans JP

Signed:

Winnifred Carrington

Daniel Carrington

Henson Carrington

Sally Carrington

Osborn Carrington

Winnifred Thompson

William Carrington

Micajah Carrington

Thomas J. Nash

Recorded 17th October 1822.

(For some reason, John Carrington's name was left off of the last portion of
this document.)

Children listed in birth order with the following exceptions: As was the
custom of the times, Thomas J. Nash signed on behalf of his wife, Mary
"Polly" Carrington (the tenth child ). Daughter and sixth child Winny's
husband, Alexander Thompson, had either abandoned his family or died by this
time. Second child, Nancy Carrington, was not mentioned in either document
nor did she sign either one; therefore, she must have died before her father
did. [dcb] 
Carrington Timothy
 
233 Name: William W. CARRINGTON
Given Name: William W.
Surname: Carrington 1 2 2
Sex: M
Birth: Abt 1792 in Georgia 1 2 2
Death: Bef 1850 in Georgia 2 2 2
Event: War of 1812 Military Service 1812 Harris County, Georgia
Note:
William Carrington served in the military enlisting as follows:
War of 1812 Service Records


Name: William Carrington
Company: 1 REGIMENT (HARRIS'), GEORGIA MILITIA.
Rank - Induction: PRIVATE
Rank - Discharge: PRIVATE
Roll Box: 35
Roll Exct: 602
3
Event: Census Report 1830 Oglethorpe County, Georgia
Note:
He was listed on page 76, as follows:
=====================
Males: 1 0-5; 1 5-10; 1 30-40;
Females: 1 0-5; 1 5-10; 120-30.
4
Event: Census Report 1840 Campbell County, Georgia
Note:
William was listed on page 24, as follows:
=========================
Males: 3 0-5; 1 5-10; 1 10-15; 1 40-50;
Females: 1 0-5; 2 5-10; 1 20-30.
Carrington William W
 
234 Elizabeth Chappell is the daughter of Dickie Chappell and Susan McCarty. Dickie Chappell was the nephew of Robert Wooding Chappell. Chappell Elizabeth E
 
235 Is listed in the Washington County Census as the next household after William Keesee, Sr. Chappell James Thomas
 
236 Letter from James Chappell to Father-in-law & Mother-in-law @1859-1860
Chappell Hill Texas Jan. 26th
Dear Father & Mother
Yours of the 10th - inst came to hand day before yesterday - found us all well.
I have been to see father Chappell today and he says that an effort made by the Gunter heirs to recover the property will prove a signal failure. He knows enough about the whole case to refute them if they are simple enough to go to law. For Grandmother Tittle / \Uncle Peter Tittle/ \ sold Nancy and the child to you, and that what they did / \in the premise/ \ gave perfect satisfaction to all the heirs. Another strong point is that the Statute of Limitations would debar them forever from the recovery of the property. He is of the opinion that he signed the Bill of Sale himself, but if he did not, he is willing to do so at any time. Now if you will send by the next mail a copy of the Bill of Sale, it will refresh his memory and, he will then be prepared to give his affidavit more satisfactory to you. Send it immediately. From the lights before him he says you need not give yourself any uneasinefs about the matter, as the opposite party can do nothing in thi case to injure you.
They are a set of Fools and Bastards and they cant do any thing, so let them rip. For John Gunter and Sally Tittle were never legally married and consequently their offspring illegitimate & not recognized in law. Uncle Peter Tittle can give you information about it. You can prove all these fact by uncle Peter. But Father will send you his affidavit when you send him a copy of the Bill of Sale. Sleep Easy. Don't be alarmed.
Ask Father any questions you think necessary and he will answer them in the affidavit. He would now send you an affidavit, but his health is bad and lives 12 miles from the Notary Public. Be sure to send a full copy, "verbatim."

Yours Respectfully
James Chappell
N.B. Father Chappell you are aware sold Nancy to Grandmother Tittle and he bought her from the Old Man KEESEE, so the property never was in the Gunter family. No need of a lawyer at present.
P.S. Have you ever got the Pecan?
Fanny has never married.

 
Chappell James Thomas
 
237 A TEXAS BAPTIST HISTORY SOURCEBOOK, A COMPANION TH MCBETH'S TEXAS BAPTIST BY JOSEPH EVERETT EARLY

Pg. 68
According to the records in the Capitol of Austin, Washington was erected into a county Dec. 14th, 1837. The first county officers under the Republic were John P. Cole, Chief Justice; R. Stephenson, Sherriff; J. P Shepperd, Clerk of the District Courty; R. Merritt, Clerk of the County Court. The first state government, elected July 13, 1846, were NIMROD J. CHAPPELL, CHIEF JUSTICE; Geo. W. Horton, Probate Judge; Dawson D. Crumpler, Clerk of the Dist. Court; John Gray, Clerk of the County Court; James W. McDade, Sheriff. 
Chappell Nimrod J
 
238
....
Texas Methodist History (MENTION OF ROBERT CHAPPELL AS TRUSTEE OF RUTERSVILLE COLLEGE)

Saturday, April 21, 2012
This Week in Texas Methodist History April 22
Bell and Granville Families Donate Land for Church, April 26, 1839


Settlers in the Republic of Texas were cash poor but land rich. Abel Stevens took advantage of that fact in his brief missionary visit to Texas and solicited donations of land for the Methodist Episcopal Church.

On April 26, 1839, two couples, Thomas and Abigail Bell and Benjamin and Nancy Granville, responded to the solicitation and donated two tracts of land on the banks of Piney Creek in central Austin County for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church. That donation led to the formation of a church that is now known as Bellville UnitedMethodist Church.

Thomas Bell and his brother James immigrated from Florida to Austin?s Colony in 1822. Benjamin Granville, a native of England, came some years later. Thomas Bell and Benjamin Granville married sisters in the fall of 1837 and established farmsteads near each other. The young immigrants threw themselves into the religious activities available to them in the last years of Mexican rule and the early years of the Republic. Thomas Bell attended the September, 1834, Camp Meeting on Caney Creek that led to the call for missionaries, and both Thomas and James Bell pledged to support a circuit rider at the second Caney Creek Camp Meeting in September, 1835. A previous post (Feb. 5, 2012) relates the story of how Stevens and Hoes were guided through the night by Thomas Bell?s leading family devotions.

The deed of gift is particularly valuable as an historic document. It tells us that the tract is on Piney Creek ?down from the camp ground.? We know from other deed records that William Medford bought 300 adjacent acres ?where he now lives? from Bell the previous October. Medford had been admitted O.T. in the Missouri Conference and rode circuits in Indiana, Illinois, and Arkansas (all part of the Missouri Conference at one time) before locating and moving to Texas. He was also a participant in the 1834 Caney Creek Camp Meeting.

The trustees named in the deed are also of considerable interest. Local preachers John Wesley Kenney and Henry Matthews both appear as trustees. Kenney lived about five miles to the north and Matthews divided his time between San Felipe and Houston. Several of the trustees (Josiah Crosby, Madison Davis, Edward Cabler) names also appear as trustees on the deed to the Methodist church at Washington, executed by Martin Ruter in Feb. 1838. Another Piney Creek Trustee, ROBERT CHAPPELL was a also a trustee of Rutersville College.

William Medford and Abel Stevens witnessed the signatures on the deed. Although Medford was a local preacher, by this date he was also an assistant county clerk of AustinCounty and, in that position was very helpful to other Methodists trying to prove valid land claims.

The tract on Piney was the not the last of Bell?s land donations. In 1846 the state legislature responded to local petitions seeking the removal of the county seat of Austin County from San Felipe to a more convenient central location. San Felipe, which had been Stephen F. Austin?s colonial headquarters, had been burned during the revolution and never really recovered. New settlers preferred the sandy forested uplands and rolling Fayette Prairie of northern Austin County to the poorly drained, unhealthy coastal plains surrounding San Felipe.

Thomas Bell offered a 108 acre tract for the new county seat. His main rival was David Ayres who offered property at Centre Hill. The Methodist property on Piney Creek was about half way between the two tracts.




On December 23, 1846 the voters chose Bell?s offer over Centre Hill. A surveyor surveyed the Bell tract into lots, and in 1848, Bellville was founded. David Ayres moved to Galveston and remained a stalwart of Texas Methodism for the rest of his long life.




Methodists realized they needed a location in town rather than on Piney Creek. They sold the Bell donation tract and built a church in town. Bellville UMC traces its origin to that church. 
Chappell Robert Wooding
 
239
The Town (Chappell Hill) was named for ROBERT WOODING CHAPPELL, who came to Texas with his family and a pack of bear hounds in 1838, and was given a grant of land by the Washington County Land Commissioners in 1841. Chappell was a mighty hunter in a land that teamed with game and his is credited with killing the last buffalo in Washington County in 1850, when the press of Civilization threatened his hunting grounds he left Chappell Hill and eventually moved to Milam County where he died. (Robert W. Chappell was living in Austin County when the 1860 census was taken and died in Milam County in 1861. kp) His granddaughter, Mary Hargrove Haller, purchased the 100 acres townsite on February 2, 1847 and a post office was established in November of that same year. Jacob Haller, husband of Mary Haller, was appointed the first postmaster. The town tract was divided into blocks, with streets and alleys laid off in a regular pattern, and sale of lots began in the fall of 1849. Records show that there were at least two store operating prior to that time, one owned by Methodist minister and entrepreneur Lorenzo D. Bragg, and the other by Terrell A. Jackson and John C. Wallis. The county deed records (see documents kp) show that a mill was built by Alvah Payne in 1843 on New Years Creek, the site to be paid for in "good cedar plank at $3.00 for each hundred feet". The first mills employed sash saws, which were operated by water power, but a steam-driven mill was in operation on the outskirts of Chappell Hill by 1848. Houses built of the aromatic cedar are virtually impervious to rot and termites. As early as 1852, however, records show that the supply of local cedar has been consideralby diminished and pine lumber was being hauled to Washington County from Harris and Grimes Counties at a cost of $15 to $30 per thousand. The deed records of Washington County, where it is recorded that on January 14, 1852, (see documents kp) Jacob and Mary Haller transferred one acres of land between the Male and Female Institutes in the town tract of Chappell Hill to Jesse W. Glass, WM. KEESEE, R. J. Swearington, Jacob Haller, Alex Hargrove (brother of Mary Hargrove Haller), L. D. Bragg and James Hanna, trustee of the M. E. Church South. Upon this site a church was erected. This original Methodist Church building was destroyed in the great storm of 1900.
The stage coach inn was built on the corner of Main and Chestnut Streets in 1850 by Jacob Haller as his home. It was sold to Charlotte Hargrove(mother of Mary Hargrove Haller and sister in-law of Wiliam Keesee kp) in 1851, and was operated as a stage coach stop for many years.
In a conveyence dated November 13, 1850, Jacob and Mary Haller transferred one acres of land in the Southeastern Corner of the town tract to the Chappell Hill institute, the foundation for a school building having already been laid at this location. This is the earlist documented record of an educational institution in the town of Chappell HIll. Students of both sexes attended classes in the same building. This situation, although convenient, was not to the liking of the trustees; on January 14, 1852, the one acre lot adjoining the institute on the north was deed to the Methodist Church. The deed stating that a Female Institute was then being erected on a lot north of the church property. The two school sites thus did not share a common boundary but were separated by the Methodist Church, and a discreet division of the sexes was accomplished by moving the female students into the new structure. Board, washing, lights and fuel, etc. per month... $6.00 to $9.00. Mrs. Hargrove could accommodate 40. Much of the town was wiped out by a yellow fever epidemic. 
Chappell Robert Wooding
 
240 Date of death from document received from the Masonic Lodge and Museum Waco Texas Chappell Robert Wooding
 
241

..Saturday, March 31, 2012




This Week in Texas Methodist History April 1



Texas Conference Commissioners Meet in Galveston to Create Soule University, April 2, 1855




The 15th session of the Texas Annual Conference, meeting in Chappell Hill in December, 1854, authorized a commission to create a school. That commission met the following April in Galveston and entertained proposals from four groups to provide a location for that school.




The composition of the commission reflected sort of a ?cabinet without a bishop.? It included Presiding Elders of the conference. R. W. Kennon was host P. E. of the Galveston District. Solomon Yarborough of Huntsville, Homer Thrall of Rutersville, Daniel Morse of Austin, J. E. Ferguson of Victoria were also presiding elders. Robert Alexander, the acknowledged dean of the conference, had become agent for the American Bible Society at the previous conference. Any such commission would have to include him. The Reverends Josiah Whipple, James Wesson, and John S. McGee also made their way to Galveston to participate. (Previous blogs have told stories of Whipple, Wesson, and McGee. Enter each name in the search window to access them.)




Presiding Elder Kennon chaired the commission. He opened the meeting on April 2, but read a telegram informing them that Whipple, Morse, and McGee were still in Houston and would arrive later that night. On motion of Robert Alexander the commission adjourned without acting.




On April 3 the commission reconvened. They considered proposals from Richmond, San Felipe, Waco, and Chappell Hill. All four of the proposed sites were along the BrazosRiver, and a case could be made for each. There was, however, no contest. R. J. Swearingen and William Chappell presented notes and pledges amounting to almost $50,000 in support of the Chappell Hill proposal. The vote for Chappell Hill was unanimous.

The commissioners named the new school in honor of Bishop Joshua Soule. The trustees hired William Halsey as president, and classes began. The Texas Legislature charted SouleUniversity on Feb. 2, 1856, less than a year after the commissioners chose Chappell Hill.




Soule University enjoyed rosy prospects for success. It enjoyed the patronage of wealthy Methodists and the East Texas Conference added its support in 1856. The Civil War and a yellow fever epidemic devastated Soule University, but its legacy lives on at Southwestern University.  
Chappell William C
 
242 _________________________ Found on Portal of Texas
Letter from William Chappell to J. D. Giddings Nov. 2, 1872
Letter from William Chappell to J. D. Giddings. Chappell begins by stating that he has seen a copy of the order that the Soule University Board of Trustees gave the Building Committee to hypothecate all the estate real and personal in order to secure a loan to build a stone edifice. HOwever, the committee failed to inculd the Rock Building and donated lands in the hypothecation, and this failure is not the fault of the Board of Trustees because it was explicit in its instruction to include all estate real and personal. Discussing a different matter, he explains how WILLIAM KEESEE with a black man purchased d. Ayr' land, which had been given to him by his father in
Alabama in 1837 or 1838. The deed to Mr. Ayr's land was not made until after Keesee's death. Ayrs knew that the land had been donated, but Chappell does not know whether he deeded it to the university or his heirs. 
Chappell William C
 
243 ___________________________________________________

Joseph Jackson to Wm. Chappell July 1845

Know all men by these presents ____ consideration of the sum of One hundred and sevteen dollars to me paid by Wm Chappell of said county and Republic have grants, bargained, sold ___ and of these presents do grant, bargain ____unto the said Wm Robert? Chappell all that portion of land lying inthe fork of cedar creek commencing on the north fork abut six hundred yards from O. P. Garrett's residence and about the same said Wm. Chappell on the branch that ____ between son's residents on a ___for Wm. Chappell N. E. corner and said Garrett S.E. Corner _____of a league granted to David Laurence on the _____of New Years Creek from said stake North ___hundred fifty varas to a stake __ on the South fork of said Cedar Creek ____ ______ Wm Chappell, Wm Keesee & Wm Hargrove's land and also for the ______ of the _____ ___ that is a ___ thence down said branch of Cedar to the fork thence up the north fork to the beginning. ____the land east of sadi line containig fifty two acres more or less together with all and .................

Mentions the name William Robert Chappell several times. Was his middle name Robert? 
Chappell William C
 
244 Upon the death of George Harvey's father, Allen, Robert Clarke, Jr. is appointed George's guardian. Court order dated 18 Apr 1733.
Robert Clarke, Jr. was the son of Robert and Jane (Rogers) Clarke, a nephew of Ellen (Rogers ) MiddletonHarvey. Robert Clarke, Sr. died intestate, his estate administered by his wife, J ane (Rogers) Clarke by Court Order 14 May 1744 - Northumberland County, Virginia. 
Clark Jr. Robert
 
245 Marriage
Bef. 1832 ? Jones County, Georgia, USA
Based on daughter Sarah birth about 1832 and the 1850 census showing her daughter Nancy as 13 years old and other information of other children in 1840 Cleland census she would have been about 18 years old when she married. 
Cleland Sarah Elizabeth
 
246 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
247 Another possibility for the wife of William Cleland
NOTE: Ann is the widow of William Willingham, son of Isaac d. 1810 Columbia Co., GA. This William Willingham is her son and the Smith girls are granddaughters and daughters of her daughter, Nancy, who married first to William Cleland and second to Joseph Smith.
Possible that Nancy the daughter of William Willingham was Nancy the wife of William Cleland. 
Cleland William Robert
 
248 Re: William Cleland Immigrant Charleston early 1800's
By Tom Roberts August 04, 2003 at 05:56:10
In reply to: Re: William Cleland Immigrant Charleston early 1800's
Dianne Swinler 7/25/03
Dianne, I would like what ever information that you have. Below is the info that I have on William and Nancy Cleland

WILLIAM ROBERT CLELAND was born Abt. 1805 in England, and died March 1843 in Jones Co, GA.He married NANCY GLASS, daughter of ZACHARIAH GLASS and SARAH WAGNON.She was born Abt. 1815, and died January 28, 1874 in Jones Co, GA.

Notes for WILLIAM ROBERT CLELAND:
William was a very wealthy man who came from England to Charleston, SC and then to Georgia. A William Cleland was listed in the 1828 Monroe County Tax Digest with no land; the Jones County Deed Books N p 113 living in Jasper County in 1823 and Q p 81 1839 living in Jones County; and the Jones County Minute Book 1837 - 1854 p17 dated 5/12/1838. The 1840 Jones Co, GA census indicated he lived with his wife and four girls under ten. He owned 16 slaves with ten people working in Agriculture. He and three of his children died in March of 1843 from some disease. They and many of William's grandchildren were buried in the Cleland/Newby Cemetery in Jones Co, GA which was part of his original estate. I could find not find his will, but there are a number of records in the Record Book # L and others in the Jones Co, GA courthouse listing and distributing his estate which was extensive. The value of his slaves and personal property were $11,119.46. His wife and surviving three daughters received his property by lot.


Notes for NANCY GLASS:
The only proof that I have that she is the daughter of Zachariah Glass is a piece of paper in his estate on file in the Newton Co, GA courthouse stating the following "November the 4 - 1833 Rece of James Glass one of the adaminitrats (sic) of Zachariah Glass Dieced (sic) Three Hundred Dollars in part of said Estate from ???? By me one of the Legatees (sic) Wm Cleland." Reference number 9 also indicates her maiden name was either Glass or Williamson.
After William died she married Joseph Smith on October 24, 1844 in Jones Co, GA. She is listed in the 1850 and 1860 census living with her husband and his/hers/their children. She is listed as 35/45 years old in the 1850/60 censuses. Family ledgens claims she and her second husband separated. She is buried in the Cleland/Newby cementery in Jones County. Her tombstone gives her date of death but not her birth.

Children of WILLIAM CLELAND and NANCY GLASS are:
i. SARAH ELIZABETH (BETSY) CLELAND, b. October 18, 1832, GA; d. March 30, 1914, Jones Co, GA; m. DANIEL JEFFERSON (JEFF) NEWBY, November 22, 1849, Jones Co, GA; b. February 22, 1826, GA; d. February 15, 1882, Jones Co, GA.
ii. NANCY CLELAND, b. December 25, 1836; d. November 16, 1910, Jones Co, GA; m. DAVID MITCHELL, May 12, 1853, Jones , GA.
iii. MARY J. CLELAND, b. Bef. 1840; d. March 1843, Jones Co, GA.
iv. MARTHA CLELAND, b. Bef. 1840; d. March 1843, Jones Co, GA.
v. WILLIAM CLELAND, JR, b. Aft. 1840; d. March 1843, Jones Co, GA.
vi. BETHENA CLELAND, b. Abt. 1844. 
Cleland William Robert
 
249 ____________________________________________________

1838 Jones County, Georgia William Cleland administrator of estate of Thomas Cleland.
1838 Savannah Stockholders mention in Jones Count, GA Mary Cleland

1850 Census David D. Mitchell lived with Joseph and Nancy Cleland Smith 
Cleland William Robert
 
250 Abilene Reporter News


Calvin J. Clemmer, 87, died Friday, July 22, 2005 at
a local medical center.

Services will be held 10:00 a.m. Tuesday at Wylie
Baptist Church with Reverend Lee Fuller and Reverend Roland Williams
officiating. Burial will follow in Elmwood Memorial Park, directed by
Elliott-Hamil Funeral Home, 542 Hickory. The family will receive
friends at a visitation 6-8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home.

Calvin was born June 1, 1918 to Ida {McDaniel} and
A. D. Clemmer in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He was reared in Oklahoma
and graduated from Stratford High School in 1937. Calvin spent two
years at New Mexico A&M University prior to joining the Army to serve
his country in WW II. He was stationed at Fort Sill Army Camp before
being sent to Camp Barkley in Abilene in 1941 with the 45th Division.
Calvin transferred to the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1942. In that
capacity he flew 50 missions during the war as a gunner and armorer on
the B-17 and the B-24 planes for 13 months in the European Theatre of
War. Calvin's most historic mission was fly- ing up the main street of
Berlin from the airbase in Foggi, Italy in 1944. He met his future
life, Marie, at a church fellowship at Elmwood Baptist Church during
his time at Camp Barkley. They were married February 5, 1944, in
Hampton, Virginia. After serving in the military, the couple made
their home in Abilene. Calvin and his wife celebrated their Golden
Wedding Anniversary in 1994 at First Baptist Church University Place.
In 2004, an observance was held for their 60th wedding anniversary at
Wylie Baptist Church.

Calvin spent 30 years with the U.S. Postal Service
where he served as local union president and state vice-president of
the Texas Postal Union. He also served as chairman of the Board of
Directors of the Abilene Postal Federal Credit Union for 20 years.
Calvin witnessed tremendous growth in the credit union during this
time. He retired from the U.S. Postal Service in 1976. Calvin and his
wife owned and operated Lucile's Flower Shop from 1976 to 1985. Since
1983, he was involved in ranching and raising Beefmaster cattle.
Calvin was a member of the Southwest Texas Cattle Raiser's Association
and served as chairman of the agricultural committee. He was also a
member of the Kiwanis Club of Abilene.

Calvin was a Baptist and began serving as an
ordained deacon in 1945 at Elmwood Baptist Church. He also served his
Lord, Jesus Christ, in numerous ways. He was Associational Sunday
School Director from 1953-1954 and again from 1973-1974. While an
active member of the First Baptist Church of Abilene he was a member
of the Deacon Board, Director of Adult 2 Sunday School Department, a
member and president of LLL Club, and very active in the Majestic
Sounds Choir. He was also Minister of Education at Wylie Baptist
Church from 1975 through 1981. Calvin and his wife, Marie, returned to
active membership there in 1999 and are members of Pairs and Spares
Sunday School Class.

Calvin was preceded in death by his parents;
brothers Ernie Clemmer and Dalton Clemmer; and sisters Mavie Clemmer,
Mary Ellis, Altha Nelson, Minnie Sparks, and Marie Johnson.

Survivors include his wife, Marie Keesee Clemmer of
Abilene; a son, James "Jim" Clemmer and wife, Tommie, of Bethany,
Oklahoma; a daughter, Karen Clemmer Camp and husband, Tom, of Abilene;
seven beloved grandchildren: Jason Clemmer and wife, Heather, Keri
Clemmer Ihle and husband, Jimmy, Ashleigh Clemmer, Bryan Camp and
wife, Lisa, Brent Camp and wife, Alison, Britney Camp, and Brandon
Camp; three great-grandchildren: Marissa Elliott, Griffin Camp, and
Grayson Camp; and a sister, Geneva Norvell and husband, Dave, of
Norman, Oklahoma.
 
Clemmer Calvin J
 

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