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Keesee George Marion
Male 1830 - 1892

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  • Birth  11 Oct 1830  Tuscaloosa County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  04 Dec 1892  Wilson County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I3  Keesee
    Last Modified  20 Oct 2011 
     
    Father  Keesee William, Sr.,   b. 08 Apr 1809, Sumner County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Sep 1864, Washington County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Chappell Mary J.,   b. 02 Dec 1810, Maury or Wilson County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Mar 1852, Chappell Hill, Washington County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  14 Aug 1828  Tuscaloosa County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Documents Information taken from "History of Methodism in Alabama" by Anson West 1899.
    Dudley Hargrove mentioned is the father of William Dudley Hargrove who moved to Washington County Texas. William Dudley married Charlotte Chappell the sister of Mary Chappell Keesee. Martha Wooding Hargrove, daughter of William Dudley and Charlotte Chappell Hargrove married Gideon Keesee, brother of William Keesee, Washington County, Texas. Mentioned later in the text is Chappell. This reference is to Robert Wooding Chappell, father of Mary Chappell Keesee and Charlotte Chappell Hargrove; also namesake of Chappell Hill, Texas.
    With the early guidance of Rev. Hargrove and members of the family, William Keesee and his father in-law, Robert Wooding Chappell were able to establish a Methodist Society immediately upon their move to Washington County, Texas.
    William Keesee first purchased property in Washington County, Texas in the fall of 1837 and at the same time Dr. Martin Ruter, was appointed first Methodist Missionary Superintendent to Texas and records show they were quickly connected in Texas working to establish Methodist Societies and a Church in Washington County, Texas.
    Family ID  F1  Group Sheet
     
    Family 1  Dever Nancy S.,   b. 1833,   d. 1855, Washington County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  18 Aug 1852  Washington County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • William Harvey Dever was the father of Nancy Dever, first wife of George Marion Keesee. William Dever was also a neighbor to William Keesee Sr..

      William Harvey Dever

      Dixie Ann Foster

      DRT #17310

      William Harvey Dever was born Christmas day 1802 in Buncombe County, North Carolina. He was the son of Nathaniel Dever and Arabella Gray. His father was killed in the Revolutionary War at Kings Mountain. His mother married again. William was chafing at his mother?s remarriage.

      Feeling the westward urge, William met Moses Austin (who was talking Texas, although he had never been there). William did not wait. Traveling from Missouri he reached the Red River at Pecan Point just above Sherman. He floated way to the South, finally reaching the renegade outpost of Nachidoches. He equipped himself and following the old Nachidoches Trace towards San Antonio, a Jesuit settlement, William turned south just above what is now Navasota and reached the Brazos River at Hidalgo Bluffs. He crossed by canoe 12 January, 1819 at the age of 17. He settled near a cedar brake two miles from where Washington-on-the-Brazos is now. He named the creak Doe Run after the one near his birthplace. He and his man Reuben built the first house between the Louisiana line and San Antonio, a four room house of cedar logs. In wet weather they hewed the inside smooth.

      Moses Austin visited in 1821. William was strong, tall, silent, but determined in his dealings. As he was there first and had acquired considerable land, he felt Austin should not intrude. The breach grew between William and Austin. Austin never settled at Washington, as originally planned, but located his colony down the Brazos at San Felipe.

      William?s sweetheart, Catherine came to Texas with his newly widowed mother, Arabella and he young children. William made his house and horses available to old Dr. Burleson, the founder of Baylor College, and Rev Thrall, the first Methodist preacher in Texas, among others.

      At 6?3", William was barred from all rifle shooting contests in the early days because of his unerring marksmanship. He was a sentinel and a witness to the drawing of the Declaration of Independence. He was called away before all had signed. His help was needed in rescuing his family. The rumor of the Mexican Army approaching required him to go, with 17 others, to the relief of the Alamo. They reached the outskirts of San Antonio on the morning of 5 March 1836 as it was being stormed by the Mexican Army. He was a scout and a courier in Houston?s army at San Jacinto. He was one of the party to cut Vince?s bridge that would cut off the retreat of Santa Anna?s army.

      Will and Catherine raised eleven children. He lived in Washington County to the age of sixty-nine. Thrall?s "Memoirs" justifies the actions of William when he knocked down and whipped Sam Houston who had mistreated a fine horse in his presence.
    • Arabella Gray Dever Harrington, grandmother of Nancy Dever Keesee.

      Arabella Gray

      by Dixie Ann Foster

      DRT #19911S

      Arabella Gray Dever Harrington was the daughter of and the wife of Revolutionary soldiers. She was a well educated, accomplished young woman. Her mother had experienced a nervous breakdown when her husband was killed at King?s Mountain. The children had been farmed out until her recovery at which time she reunited her family. Arabella in her marriage to Nathaniel Dever, began a progressive move west. First to western North Carolina and later, to the Illinois Territory. The men drove the cattle overland while Arabella followed by flatboat with the furnishings and the children Margaret, Frances, Elijah and William watched with their parents as the Captain fled with all their possessions. Nathan Dever, a linguist, was to work with the Indians to prevent their siding with the English who hoped to regain the Illinois Territory.

      In 1810, Nathan died of the "fever" alongside Auger Creek. In December of 1810, baby Mary Mariah was born to her grieving mother (outrageous Arabella having probated the will moved her family into Missouri in time for the 1811 Earthquake. Nathan?s brother, William, came for the girls on horseback thinking they would be better off in North Carolina. Arabella planned to follow. She may have progressed as far as Kentucky, when John William Harrington, debonair Irishman, swept her off her feet. This marriage began a new family. Harrington'? sternness and absence of working skill caused 15 year old William Harvey Dever to head for Texas. Though he had bet the Austin?s, he decided not to wait for the Austin Colony. Once settled and maturing and knowing his mother needed to own land for security, William urged his mother to bring her new family to Texas. Pausing to work in Arkansas, not only J. W. Harrington lost his life, but also young Elijah Dever was killed in a sawmill accident. Undaunted, Arabella proceeded by horseback with 2 year old John Walton clinging to her neck. The girls, Lydia and Mahala rode in the wagon with the household goods. They stayed with William Devers, while their two-room cabin was built on Arabella?s land grant that was to become the city of Brenham. Arabella planned one room for the horse and cow and one for the family. Arabella fed travelers and served as a mid-wife. One day Arabella was called away to deliver a baby. She left Lydia in charge of young John Walton Harrington. As she was feeding him pinion nuts, Indians invaded the cabin and began roasting the potato supply in the fireplace. Suddenly one of them decided to scalp young John.. (to be continued)
    Last Modified  26 Oct 2011 
    Family ID  F3  Group Sheet
     
    Family 2  Flake Rhoda,   b. 1831,   d. 28 Dec 1900, Hays County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  20 Dec 1855  Austin County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Keesee Robert J.,   b. 1857, Washington County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 21 Nov 1887, Hays County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location
    >2. Keesee Thomas F.,   b. 1858/1859, Washington County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1923, Jones County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location
    >3. Keesee Gideon G.,   b. 1861, Washington County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Keesee Mary M.,   b. 1864
     5. Keesee Minnie,   b. 1868
    Documents
    Marriage Certificate for George Marion Keesee and Rhoda Flake Dorroh
    Marriage Certificate for George Marion Keesee and Rhoda Flake Dorroh
    1880 Hays County Texas Census
    1880 Hays County Texas Census
    George Marion Keesee and wife, Rhoda Flake Keesee and children, Gideon, Mary, Minnie. Also living with them is Rhoda's mother, Melinda Flake
     George M. Keesee and wife, Rhoda A. Keesee to Eliza C. Gardner
    Washington County, Texas, April 2nd, 1861, One tract 204 acres, Second tract 50 acres, and Third 25 acres with one acre excepted for Cemetery
    1900 Hays County, Texas Census, taken June 1900
    1900 Hays County, Texas Census, taken June 1900
    Rhoda Keesee, wife of George Marion is shown living with her son Henry J. Dorroh and his family; Fannie A, William N., James B., Birtie, Jefferson and a niece Minnie B. Walter
    1860 Washington County, Texas Census; P. O. Union Hill, taken July 31, 1860
    1860 Washington County, Texas Census; P. O. Union Hill, taken July 31, 1860
    #759 G. M. Keesee 30, Rhoda 27, Robert 3, Thomas 2,
    William Dorroh 12, Jethro Dorroh 11 (stepsons)
    Last Modified  23 Jun 2011 
    Family ID  F4  Group Sheet
     
  • Photos
    La Bahia Cemetery was located on land owned by George Marion Keesee.  The deed mentions the cemetery excepted.
    La Bahia Cemetery was located on land owned by George Marion Keesee. The deed mentions the cemetery excepted.
    La Bahia Cemetery is East of Carmine, TX close to the junction of 290 and 237. From Carmine go NE on 290 to Gerland Wagoner Rd (go South-East), approx. 1 mile to 237. Turn L onto 237 to Co. Rd. 2/Boundary School Rd. Turn R on Co. Rd. 2/Boundary School Rd. Go approx. 1/2 mile to La Bahia Cemetery on Left, set back from road. Small cemetery - only 178 recorded interments.
     
    Documents
    1880 Hays County, Texas Production of Agriculture Schedule
    1880 Hays County, Texas Production of Agriculture Schedule
    Terrissa Lackey, George Keesee
     Indenture George W. Keesee to J. W. Middleton, Washington County, Texas Dec. 3rd, 1859 This should read George M. Keesee which is often recorded as W.
    Refers to Woodford Sanford League, mentions children heirs of Mary Keesee, 2200 acres
     
  • Notes 
    • Deeds from Wilson County Texas from John Dorroh

      S-239, S-241 O. P. Reed to George Keesee, subdivision #9 of T. F. L. Parrott survey 160 acres on the headwater of Alum and Ecleto Creeks. Sept. 15, 1888. Acres not stated.

      30-37 Map of T. F. L. Parrott survey, subdivision 9, 148 1/5 acres, near junction of Cuero and San Antonio road and road to Stockdale. Ecleto Creek to northwest.

      ----------------------------------------------
    • John Alexander Hargrove (George Marion Keesee's cousin) purchased 25 acres from George Keesee whenever John Alexander moved to Milam County, Texas. This is referenced in John Alexander Hargrove's Biography written 1903.

      ------------------------------------------------

    • Name:G. M. Keesee



      Name Note:
      Also Known As:George Keesee

      Also Known As Note:


      Event:Military Service



      Rank In:Private
      Rank In Note:
      Rank Out:Private
      Rank Out Note:
      Side:Confederate
      Side Note:
      State (or Origin):Texas
      Military Unit:35th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Brown's)
      Military Unit Note:
      Company:B
      Company Note:
      General Note:Original filed under George/Keesee
      NARA Publication Title:

      Index to Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations From the State of Texas.
      NARA Publication Number:

      M227
      NARA Roll Number:20
      Film Number:880033